Pancho Villa Treasure

Gulf Coast Pirate

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sdcfia

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There are also strong allegations that Villa (born Jose Arambula), along with Emil Holmdahl and possibly others, either stashed or recovered gold in southern New Mexico. Some say this took place in the Caballos and was somehow associated with a map. Others claim the site is Tres Hermanas. All pretty sketchy, but then, all treasure tales are pretty sketchy.
 

Crow

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Here is article from Madera Mercury 17 March 1916. Maybe Guerro in Mexico is the place to look. That said still the proverbial needle in a haystack.

madera mercury 17 march 1916.JPG


Crow
 

BennyV

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There are also strong allegations that Villa (born Jose Arambula), along with Emil Holmdahl and possibly others, either stashed or recovered gold in southern New Mexico. Some say this took place in the Caballos and was somehow associated with a map. Others claim the site is Tres Hermanas. All pretty sketchy, but then, all treasure tales are pretty sketchy.
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Old Bookaroo

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I wouldn't spend a great deal of time searching for the treasure hidden by a man who had, by some accounts, as many as fifteen wives. There is a fine museum in Chihuahua with many artifacts from the life of José Doroteo Arango Arámbula, including the automobile in which he was killed.

The Treasure Album of Pancho Villa (1962) by Jesse Ed Rascoe [Ed Bartholomew] has a great many photos of his life, and some information on the treasure yarns.

For what it is worth, from Ken Krippene's Buried Treasure (The Road to Gold) (1950):

Pancho Villa Treasure Map.jpg


Good luck to all,

The Old Bookaroo
 

sdcfia

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Emil Holmdahl was a fascinating character, like a cat with 9 lives. I think he had been shot multiple times in his career as a mercenary.
If anyone had insight about Villa burying treasure it would be Emil Holmdahl and he believed so.

Crow
Wiki offers a decent and lengthy synopsis of his life, mostly lifted from a biography, Soldier of Fortune.

"Emil Lewis Holmdahl (August 26, 1883 – April 8, 1963) was a machine gunner, soldier of fortune, spy, gun runner, and treasure hunter who fought under Frederick Funston and John J. Pershing in the Spanish–American War and subsequent Philippine–American War (Philippine Insurrection), under Lee Christmas in Central America, under Francisco Madero, Pancho Villa, and Venustiano Carranza in the Mexican Revolution, and under John J. Pershing again in World War I. In 1926, Holmdahl was accused of having stolen Francisco Pancho Villa's head."

Holmdahl's personal papers are archived at the Bancroft Library in Berkeley. I haven't looked into those, but maybe I'll find the time.
https://oac.cdlib.org/search?style=...il+Lewis+Holmdahl+papers,+1905-1958.&x=29&y=2

Holmdahl spent considerable time looking for Villa caches in MX. The southern NM allegations came from an email I got from someone about twenty years ago, and I'm still trying to locate it.

Screenshot 2023-08-24 at 8.07.56 AM.png
 

Crow

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For anyone wanting to research further into possible hidden catches by Villa or alleged caches by Villa. That is the money ticket? the starting point researching the papers at John Bancroft library.

It should be noted There was many other players in the Mexican Revolution and many of them looted themselves and most likely had caches of their own. Many of them did not survive. Holmdahl knew many of them. So perhaps there are caches of other looters that are now attributed to Villa still out there?

Crow
 

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Old Bookaroo

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For anyone wanting to research further into possible hidden catches by Villa or alleged caches by Villa. That is the money ticket? the starting point researching the papers at John Bancroft library.

It should be noted There was many other players in the Mexican Revolution and many of them looted themselves and most likely had caches of their own. Many of them did not survive. Holmdahl knew many if them. So perhaps there are caches of other looters that are now attributed to Villa still out there?

Crow

Not to be pedantic, but it is the Bancroft Library (UC Berkeley) named for Herbert Howe Bancroft. It is remarkable that the collection went across San Francisco Bay in late 1905, less than six months before the '06 Fire and Earthquake.

Perhaps, someday, the legendary Casimiro Streeter MS. will surface from that vast trove of books, pamphlets, newspapers, papers and other documents.

Good luck to all,

The Old Bookaroo
 

Crow

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Hello Bookaroo.

Zebina Nathaniel Streeter -- aka Johnatan Casimiro Streeter, aka The White Apache was an interesting character. I did not know he had a manuscript? Bancroft Library is full of historical treasures. the repercussions for that earthquake and fire in 1906 are still being felt today 117 years on. So much early records and documentation was lost. I cannot count thew times i cursed that earthquake and fire. So many historical records lost.

Many years ago in 1986 I met a retired Cambridge professor in Newton Abbot in Devon UK. Wrote a book Treasure trove. Fascinating fellow. He wrote a book called treasure trove in which he discused various treasure legends. He was fascinated by them. Although many such stories are basic versions and some had unintentional errors as he was more interested in historical references of such stories.

Strange enough he in his book mentions Casimiro Streeter with group of Apaches When they was on a raiding party north east of Cananea, was looking down into canyon where he saw a ruined church tower and church. And he was told by his fellow Apaches that was Tayopa. I never knew or asked at the time where he got the reference from?

When you mentioned his name that twigged in the old black birdies brain.:tongue3:

But Alas that is slipping off topic a little as found some documents with Emil Holmdahl search of buried treasure in Mexico.

Crow
 

sdcfia

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Hello Bookaroo.

Zebina Nathaniel Streeter -- aka Johnatan Casimiro Streeter, aka The White Apache was an interesting character. I did not know he had a manuscript? Bancroft Library is full of historical treasures. the repercussions for that earthquake and fire in 1906 are still being felt today 117 years on. So much early records and documentation was lost. I cannot count thew times i cursed that earthquake and fire. So many historical records lost.

Many years ago in 1986 I met a retired Cambridge professor in Newton Abbot in Devon UK. Wrote a book Treasure trove. Fascinating fellow. He wrote a book called treasure trove in which he discused various treasure legends. He was fascinated by them. Although many such stories are basic versions and some had unintentional errors as he was more interested in historical references of such stories.

Strange enough he in his book mentions Casimiro Streeter with group of Apaches When they was on a raiding party north east of Cananea, was looking down into canyon where he saw a ruined church tower and church. And he was told by his fellow Apaches that was Tayopa. I never knew or asked at the time where he got the reference from?

When you mentioned his name that twigged in the old black birdies brain.:tongue3:

But Alas that is slipping off topic a little as found some documents with Emil Holmdahl search of buried treasure in Mexico.

Crow
Not so much slipping off topic, but a good reminder to readers that serious snooping about treasure legends is vastly improved when you can reduce the degrees of separation between the actual events and the teller of the story.

Holmdahl is a great example of the best case available - only one degree of separation, because he was a real person, he was personally involved in the hunt, and he documented and saved his evidence, which is available. Every additional degree of separation away from true events reduces the plausibility of the telling - often radically. Do you want a treasure writer's (or worse, a newspaper reporter's) sensational version, or the memoirs of the actual person who was there? Of course, all evidence hinges on the truthfulness of the person who was there, but IMO, a snooper can't improve on that.
 

Crow

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But there is ways and means you can verify things. If you cant verify place aside and move on to the next research project. There is no money in chasing rainbows? As we all there is a long history of treasure hunters that did not know when to hold and when to fold. Chasing blindly and obsessively until it destroyed them or their lives.

This story is very interesting for me but its not my fish to fry. I no longer need money or the need take the risks involved. I can post some things regarding this story.

Other things I cannot as contravenes confidential information that has been revealed to me. it might be seen as old school but I have lived by it, some times to my regret. Regardless I am a old raggedy old bird of his word.

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Emil Lewis Holmdahl went to Mexico for A 'mining project." after serving in WW1. Here below is a ltter emploring the secetary of State to Allow Emil Lewis Holmdahl to go to Mexico City by Frank Risdon More

REFERENCE 1920.JPG





Weather that was his true intention that was present at his application for passport in 1920.



Its late in my part of the world and old crow needs to roost.

To be continued.



Crow
 

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Old Bookaroo

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Hello Bookaroo.

Zebina Nathaniel Streeter -- aka Johnatan Casimiro Streeter, aka The White Apache was an interesting character. I did not know he had a manuscript? Bancroft Library is full of historical treasures. the repercussions for that earthquake and fire in 1906 are still being felt today 117 years on. So much early records and documentation was lost. I cannot count thew times i cursed that earthquake and fire. So many historical records lost.

Many years ago in 1986 I met a retired Cambridge professor in Newton Abbot in Devon UK. Wrote a book Treasure trove. Fascinating fellow. He wrote a book called treasure trove in which he discused various treasure legends. He was fascinated by them. Although many such stories are basic versions and some had unintentional errors as he was more interested in historical references of such stories.

Strange enough he in his book mentions Casimiro Streeter with group of Apaches When they was on a raiding party north east of Cananea, was looking down into canyon where he saw a ruined church tower and church. And he was told by his fellow Apaches that was Tayopa. I never knew or asked at the time where he got the reference from?

When you mentioned his name that twigged in the old black birdies brain.:tongue3:

But Alas that is slipping off topic a little as found some documents with Emil Holmdahl search of buried treasure in Mexico.

Crow

Ahoy, Crow - Yes, the White Apache's MS is supposed to relate to Tayopa. To date, the document is as elusive as the mine.

Speaking of San Francisco libraries, in the excessively rare Our Search for the Missing Millions (of Cocos Island) by "One of the Searchers" [John Chetwood] (1904) is the heart-breaking passage:

"In one of the libraries of San Francisco is a very complete pamphlet and newspaper record of Pacific Coast treasure hunts in general, and especially of the many that have taken place on Cocos Island, having been organized for that purpose from various points of the west and some points in the east."

No doubt that treasure trove perished in the '06 Fire and Earthquake.

Good luck to all,

The Old Bookaroo
 

sdcfia

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Ahoy, Crow - Yes, the White Apache's MS is supposed to relate to Tayopa. To date, the document is as elusive as the mine.

Speaking of San Francisco libraries, in the excessively rare Our Search for the Missing Millions (of Cocos Island) by "One of the Searchers" [John Chetwood] (1904) is the heart-breaking passage:

"In one of the libraries of San Francisco is a very complete pamphlet and newspaper record of Pacific Coast treasure hunts in general, and especially of the many that have taken place on Cocos Island, having been organized for that purpose from various points of the west and some points in the east."

No doubt that treasure trove perished in the '06 Fire and Earthquake.

Good luck to all,

The Old Bookaroo
There are obviously good odds that the collection was lost, but depending on where the library was located and who had access to it, maybe not 100%. The fire burned for days, and if the collection was considered important enough to save, possibly someone did.

By the way, have you checked this:
https://www.bookfinder.com/search/?...he%20missing%20millions%20of%20cocos%20island

BRM3168-BrittonRey-San-Francisco-Burned-District-1906_lowres-1024x811.jpg
 

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