Please help identify.

Sep 21, 2021
31
104
Oxon
Detector(s) used
Garret ace 250
Garret AT PRO
Garret ace 400i
Simplex
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Hi found this odd coin but can't find out what it is looks as if I maybe Roman found in UK England Buckinghamshire. Look to be made of
20230223_115347.jpg
20230223_115259.jpg
20230223_115259.jpg
20230223_115236.jpg
20230223_115254.jpg
copper
 

Attachments

  • 20230223_115359.jpg
    20230223_115359.jpg
    1.3 MB · Views: 16
Upvote 6

Digger RJ

Gold Member
Aug 24, 2017
19,460
33,584
SW Missouri/Oklahoma
🥇 Banner finds
1
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
2
Detector(s) used
Minelab CTX 3030; Minelab Equinox 800;
XP Deus 2
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting

Tigershore

Newbie
Feb 20, 2023
3
17
Hi found this odd coin but can't find out what it is looks as if I maybe Roman found in UK England Buckinghamshire. Look to be made of View attachment 2070918 View attachment 2070919 View attachment 2070919 View attachment 2070920 View attachment 2070921 copper

Hi found this odd coin but can't find out what it is looks as if I maybe Roman found in UK England Buckinghamshire. Look to be made of View attachment 2070918 View attachment 2070919 View attachment 2070919 View attachment 2070920 View attachment 2070921 copper
Nice find, it looks kinda like this!
C8F288B1-225F-4472-B670-3F23ABDEBBD4.jpeg
 

Red-Coat

Gold Member
Dec 23, 2019
5,233
16,385
Surrey, UK
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Interesting find. My guess is that it’s a 1659 farthing token, privately issued for a merchant. Stylistically, it has some uncanny similarities to this one:

Eldred.jpg

That example has a letter ‘E’ for Philip Eldred of Wallingford. He was an apothecary and the token says that on the other side, together with his name and family coat of arms. Yours isn’t a match and I’m pretty sure it has a letter ‘B’ rather than an ‘E’ but it looks like the work of the same die engraver. Token manufacturers often used the same essential design for multiple customers, changing only the name, address or business details. Note also that Wallingford is pretty close to the Buckinghamshire border.

Some more intensive searching might turn up a token match for another merchant with a surname beginning with ‘B’.
 

OP
OP
D
Sep 21, 2021
31
104
Oxon
Detector(s) used
Garret ace 250
Garret AT PRO
Garret ace 400i
Simplex
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Interesting find. My guess is that it’s a 1659 farthing token, privately issued for a merchant. Stylistically, it has some uncanny similarities to this one:

View attachment 2070949

That example has a letter ‘E’ for Philip Eldred of Wallingford. He was an apothecary and the token says that on the other side, together with his name and family coat of arms. Yours isn’t a match and I’m pretty sure it has a letter ‘B’ rather than an ‘E’ but it looks like the work of the same die engraver. Token manufacturers often used the same essential design for multiple customers, changing only the name, address or business details. Note also that Wallingford is pretty close to the Buckinghamshire border.

Some more intensive searching might turn up a token match for another merchant with a surname beginning with ‘B’.
Well done mate cheers you are right
 

Bramblefind

Silver Member
Nov 26, 2009
2,922
3,843
New York
Detector(s) used
T2/F75 SE
I had been searching through images of 17th C trade tokens - there are hundreds of them! It may be the farthing issued by Joseph Bell. There is an image from the British Museum but I am only able to access it through google images.

I thought the initials under the B could be "I.H." - seen faintly on your coin.
 

Attachments

  • bellref.jpg
    bellref.jpg
    8.5 KB · Views: 24
  • belltoken.jpg
    belltoken.jpg
    88.8 KB · Views: 23

Red-Coat

Gold Member
Dec 23, 2019
5,233
16,385
Surrey, UK
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
I had been searching through images of 17th C trade tokens - there are hundreds of them! It may be the farthing issued by Joseph Bell. There is an image from the British Museum but I am only able to access it through google images.

I thought the initials under the B could be "I.H." - seen faintly on your coin.

Yep... that sure looks like it. Well done.
 

Red-Coat

Gold Member
Dec 23, 2019
5,233
16,385
Surrey, UK
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Just a bit more. Joseph Bell was born in 1629 and died in 1692. Contemporary records show his occupation as “mercer”, which originally referred to a trader in cloth, typically fine cloth, and often imported from the Near and Far East. Later usage expanded to term to cover shopkeepers dealing in dry goods not necessarily including cloth. Although the reference found by @Bramblefind says “HEYTESBURY”, I think that’s a misinterpretation of “AEYLESBURY” as an archaic spelling of “Aylesbury”, which is where Bell was in business. It’s in Buckinghamshire, where the token was found. Bell's only token in catalogue listings seems to be the 1659 farthing.

The reference to “The Mercer’s Arms” makes it sound like he was running a pub in that name, but I think it just means the arms granted to the “Worshipful Company of Mercers”, one of our oldest liveried companies, incorporated under a Royal Charter in 1394.
 

CRUSADER

Gold Member
May 25, 2007
40,844
45,334
ENGLAND
🥇 Banner finds
27
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
1
Detector(s) used
XP Deus II v0.6 with 11" Coil
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
I had been searching through images of 17th C trade tokens - there are hundreds of them! It may be the farthing issued by Joseph Bell. There is an image from the British Museum but I am only able to access it through google images.

I thought the initials under the B could be "I.H." - seen faintly on your coin.
That was a good ID.
I find tons of these 17th C Token's & it really had very few of the hallmarks you expect. Once Red-coat did the side by side, I could also see a faint IH under the B, but that would have been a lengthy book search, so gave up thinking about it. Other than I then knew it had to be a 17th C Token, due to the configuration of the 3 letters. The I is a J for Joseph & the H is normally the first name of the Wife, like Helen.
 

Red-Coat

Gold Member
Dec 23, 2019
5,233
16,385
Surrey, UK
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
...The I is a J for Joseph & the H is normally the first name of the Wife, like Helen.

Highly likely. Joseph’s first wife (Margaret Baines) died in August 1659 but he then married Hannah Dover. Exact date not recorded, but the marriage ‘banns’ (announcements in church of intention to marry such that possible objections can be raised) were recorded in October that same year.
 

CRUSADER

Gold Member
May 25, 2007
40,844
45,334
ENGLAND
🥇 Banner finds
27
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
1
Detector(s) used
XP Deus II v0.6 with 11" Coil
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Highly likely. Joseph’s first wife (Margaret Baines) died in August 1659 but he then married Hannah Dover. Exact date not recorded, but the marriage ‘banns’ (announcements in church of intention to marry such that possible objections can be raised) were recorded in October that same year.
Hannah fits then.
 

Top Member Reactions

Users who are viewing this thread

Top