Possible Oak Island Solution

ARC

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Joking aside... I really hope they do find something one day... I mean... after all this time and work i hope something comes to light that makes the whole shibang worthwhile.
 

SSR

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Sep 24, 2019
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The OI story is one that has changed with the times. In its most humble beginnings, it is exploiting a documented tale of a possible recuperated treasure (chest) in a sunken depression under a block and tackle hanging from a tree branch on an island in Mahone bay, ca 1830, called Hobson's Nose. That's the first historical allusion to a treasure island in Mahone Bay. No mention of any other are made prior to 1830 in two very local histories written in the 1820s. There is a later a story written ca. 1840 by Thomas Haliburton which builds on the idea of a treasure island in Chester Bay, without specifically naming Oak Island. That fiction (Haliburton refers to it as a fiction) makes the suggestion that men will die in a shaft on an island in Mahone Bay looking for something that they cannot even name, and that no one will understand why. The first known searcher efforts at OI are subsequent to these accounts and they are likely an effort to locate what is already circulating to a specific location owned by colonials that was used to defraud individuals associated with the Truro group who were relatives of Anthony Vaughn's young wife. Details that may have been used as confidence ploys appear to have been created to correspond with Masonic details of stories that the public may have recognized. One thing is for certain; the stories were back dated to a time when it would have appeared to be possible, but later scrutinizing does show that the dates mentioned, the events described and the people in question are not compatible. The area on the mainland at OI was a French colonial settlement, Mirligueche, which had long been a native place of congregation during the summer months. The French had been around these parts since 1632 and Nicholas Denys had worked the area between the La Have river and Mirligueche for Oak during the latter part of the 17th century. Razilly had explored the coast there for minerals, since it was known since 1608 that the area held important deposits of mineralization (the Ovens area). The first detailed charting of Mahone Bay by the English was done in 1751 by Charles Morris. He noted only the remnants of the old French Fort at the mouth of the La Have river and the village of Mirligueche (occupied by Europeans since 1681). In 1752 the survey was used to plan a grant for German colonials at what became Lunenburg. In 1762, post the deportation of the French, the English proceeded to colonize by importing New England settlers from the colony of Rhode Island. The area around Chester was mapped and surveyed for the Shoreham grant which included OI. All known European features on OI, roads and markers, can be related to the surveying that was done there in preparation for the colonials. In 1795 lot 18 was owned by German merchant. The lot was sold that year to Smith who had been living a few lots over with his mother, which disproves the story of three young men sailing to OI to a pristine area and discovering a well-hidden, but easily identifiable site of a much earlier burial. It is very likely that Smith and Ball had worked for the German, Wollenhaupt, on his lot 18 prior to Smith acquiring it. Ball had been acquiring land on OI since he came in 1783, something that was easily doable if you petitioned the colonial government for any with taxes owing and could demonstrate that you would farm the land. OI lots had been abandoned by the New Englanders, many who had returned to the US after the Revolution or who were chased out of NS by British loyalists. The relations between Ball, Smith and Wollenhaupt may have extended to the provisioning of the local native population which had been thrown onto reserves and were starving in the winter. Wollenhaupt had a government contract to supply the natives with essential foodstuffs. At any rate, not, much else was available to the early colonials but that and to provision the garrison at Halifax also. Records show that times were very tough at OI in the 1790-1820 period. Vaughn, for what it was worth, had essentially no prospects. He was a poor scoundrel and had been written up and shamed in the local papers for having been a philanderer and a man of ill repute. The possibility exists that a ploy to defraud Vaughn's wife's rich relatives from Truro was hatched and that this was done in a way that was not dissimilar to other known treasure hoaxes that were somewhat popular in New England at that time. Vaughn, arguably, has been the most quoted of the sources for the details at OI since he later produced a signed affidavit for allegations made post 1850. It remains today that he was an undesirable fellow and that he kept the company of a known wildcat miner who was selling claims to bogus coal mines in Cape Breton. What is truly remarkable about the OI story is that it fizzled out on more than one occasion, the public largely accepting that the whole things was a scam, only to reappear years later in embellished forms stating even grander theories and finding new audiences further from the seat of the stories. There's no doubt that the initial accounts were not merely treasure related. They involved details that made the alleged shaft coincide in detail with a very famous Biblical shaft whose discovery was supposed to announce the Second Coming. This made an awful lot of sense since much of NA had latched on to the Millerite frenzy that predicted that this legendary shaft containing a stone should be discovered in 1843 or 1844. What ensured in those years is what is called The Great Disappointment. There was no Second Coming and the shaft legend needed a new story in order to survive. Subsequent variations on it would include Kidd, but the initial story seems to have resonated with Masons who, for a long time, pursued the mystery with the idea that it was not involving a material treasure. The story has just never stopped morphing ever since. I credit Masons with keeping it alive since it is they who exported it to the great US Masonic Conferences of the late 19th century where it gained a large following. Many of the printed details of the Money Pit shaft reproduced numerology of Masonic interest. Perhaps no one assisted in that more than the Rosicrucian Reginal Harris who was the long time custodian of OI histories. Have fun with it. You can use this mystery to discover interesting true history.
 

GoldenStiff

Jr. Member
Sep 28, 2022
34
13
The OI story is one that has changed with the times. In its most humble beginnings, it is exploiting a documented tale of a possible recuperated treasure (chest) in a sunken depression under a block and tackle hanging from a tree branch on an island in Mahone bay, ca 1830, called Hobson's Nose. That's the first historical allusion to a treasure island in Mahone Bay. No mention of any other are made prior to 1830 in two very local histories written in the 1820s. There is a later a story written ca. 1840 by Thomas Haliburton which builds on the idea of a treasure island in Chester Bay, without specifically naming Oak Island. That fiction (Haliburton refers to it as a fiction) makes the suggestion that men will die in a shaft on an island in Mahone Bay looking for something that they cannot even name, and that no one will understand why. The first known searcher efforts at OI are subsequent to these accounts and they are likely an effort to locate what is already circulating to a specific location owned by colonials that was used to defraud individuals associated with the Truro group who were relatives of Anthony Vaughn's young wife. Details that may have been used as confidence ploys appear to have been created to correspond with Masonic details of stories that the public may have recognized. One thing is for certain; the stories were back dated to a time when it would have appeared to be possible, but later scrutinizing does show that the dates mentioned, the events described and the people in question are not compatible. The area on the mainland at OI was a French colonial settlement, Mirligueche, which had long been a native place of congregation during the summer months. The French had been around these parts since 1632 and Nicholas Denys had worked the area between the La Have river and Mirligueche for Oak during the latter part of the 17th century. Razilly had explored the coast there for minerals, since it was known since 1608 that the area held important deposits of mineralization (the Ovens area). The first detailed charting of Mahone Bay by the English was done in 1751 by Charles Morris. He noted only the remnants of the old French Fort at the mouth of the La Have river and the village of Mirligueche (occupied by Europeans since 1681). In 1752 the survey was used to plan a grant for German colonials at what became Lunenburg. In 1762, post the deportation of the French, the English proceeded to colonize by importing New England settlers from the colony of Rhode Island. The area around Chester was mapped and surveyed for the Shoreham grant which included OI. All known European features on OI, roads and markers, can be related to the surveying that was done there in preparation for the colonials. In 1795 lot 18 was owned by German merchant. The lot was sold that year to Smith who had been living a few lots over with his mother, which disproves the story of three young men sailing to OI to a pristine area and discovering a well-hidden, but easily identifiable site of a much earlier burial. It is very likely that Smith and Ball had worked for the German, Wollenhaupt, on his lot 18 prior to Smith acquiring it. Ball had been acquiring land on OI since he came in 1783, something that was easily doable if you petitioned the colonial government for any with taxes owing and could demonstrate that you would farm the land. OI lots had been abandoned by the New Englanders, many who had returned to the US after the Revolution or who were chased out of NS by British loyalists. The relations between Ball, Smith and Wollenhaupt may have extended to the provisioning of the local native population which had been thrown onto reserves and were starving in the winter. Wollenhaupt had a government contract to supply the natives with essential foodstuffs. At any rate, not, much else was available to the early colonials but that and to provision the garrison at Halifax also. Records show that times were very tough at OI in the 1790-1820 period. Vaughn, for what it was worth, had essentially no prospects. He was a poor scoundrel and had been written up and shamed in the local papers for having been a philanderer and a man of ill repute. The possibility exists that a ploy to defraud Vaughn's wife's rich relatives from Truro was hatched and that this was done in a way that was not dissimilar to other known treasure hoaxes that were somewhat popular in New England at that time. Vaughn, arguably, has been the most quoted of the sources for the details at OI since he later produced a signed affidavit for allegations made post 1850. It remains today that he was an undesirable fellow and that he kept the company of a known wildcat miner who was selling claims to bogus coal mines in Cape Breton. What is truly remarkable about the OI story is that it fizzled out on more than one occasion, the public largely accepting that the whole things was a scam, only to reappear years later in embellished forms stating even grander theories and finding new audiences further from the seat of the stories. There's no doubt that the initial accounts were not merely treasure related. They involved details that made the alleged shaft coincide in detail with a very famous Biblical shaft whose discovery was supposed to announce the Second Coming. This made an awful lot of sense since much of NA had latched on to the Millerite frenzy that predicted that this legendary shaft containing a stone should be discovered in 1843 or 1844. What ensured in those years is what is called The Great Disappointment. There was no Second Coming and the shaft legend needed a new story in order to survive. Subsequent variations on it would include Kidd, but the initial story seems to have resonated with Masons who, for a long time, pursued the mystery with the idea that it was not involving a material treasure. The story has just never stopped morphing ever since. I credit Masons with keeping it alive since it is they who exported it to the great US Masonic Conferences of the late 19th century where it gained a large following. Many of the printed details of the Money Pit shaft reproduced numerology of Masonic interest. Perhaps no one assisted in that more than the Rosicrucian Reginal Harris who was the long time custodian of OI histories. Have fun with it. You can use this mystery to discover interesting true history.
Uh du fuh?
So you deny and disagree with the Latest testing of the waters and drill cores Showing overwhelming amounts of metals (specifically silver and gold)… more than what the testing company would normally have found at any other similar site past or present?
Is that right?

What else you got?
 

SSR

Full Member
Sep 24, 2019
112
148
Primary Interest:
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Uh du fuh?
So you deny and disagree with the Latest testing of the waters and drill cores Showing overwhelming amounts of metals (specifically silver and gold)… more than what the testing company would normally have found at any other similar site past or present?
Is that right?

What else you got?
I disagree with how you characterize the discovery of nothing of interest. The wide range of tests that have been done at OI exploit good science to make awful conclusions that science itself would not support. The effort is mainly to try and transfer the confidence we ought to have in science to the people making the conclusions. I would urge anyone to consider that there's nothing at OI that isn't exploitable for this sort of strengthening of suggestions. It's 2022 and still no one knows what they are looking for at OI. It doesn't seem to bother a lot of people that this story has no beginning. What it has is a searcher period and a literary tradition.
 
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GoldenStiff

Jr. Member
Sep 28, 2022
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I disagree with how you characterize the discovery of nothing of interest. The wide range of tests that have been done at OI exploit good science to make awful conclusions that science itself would not support. The effort is mainly to try and transfer the confidence we ought to have in science to the people making the conclusions. I would urge anyone to consider that there's nothing at OI that isn't exploitable for this sort of strengthening of suggestions. It's 2022 and still no one knows what they are looking for at OI. It doesn't seem to bother a lot of people that this story has no beginning. What it has is a searcher period and a literary tradition.
I truly hope they pull something up that smashes your position.. because most of what you’ve been LEARNED in those American History books is total Bullshit too!
 

GoldenStiff

Jr. Member
Sep 28, 2022
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13
WOW!?! What's makes you an expert on American History?!?
I’m no expert Ron… I’m just stating facts that most of the sheeple you’ve been surrounded with your whole life refuse to explore or even consider.
 

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Treasure_Hunter

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Bullshit !
That’s not even Close to what they concluded… you’re full of CRAP MAN !
Wait for Season 10 it Starts 2nd week of November…
Goldenstiff. Please post by our rules.
 

Treasure_Hunter

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Uh du fuh? Say what? Can you elaborate please?
There is a link in my signature to our rules and terms that will help. We are a family friendly forum and have rules on language, we also have rules on insulting and attacking other members.
 

GoldenStiff

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There is a link in my signature to our rules and terms that will help. We are a family friendly forum and have rules on language, we also have rules on insulting and attacking other members.
are you implying that I used language, insult and attacks? Against who?
Are you sensitive or something?
 

Treasure_Hunter

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are you implying that I used language, insult and attacks? Against who?
Are you sensitive or something?
I repeat, please read and post by our rules.
 

Treasure_Hunter

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Primary Interest:
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SSR

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Sep 24, 2019
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I truly hope they pull something up that smashes your position.. because most of what you’ve been LEARNED in those American History books is total Bullshit too!
I know of no local histories focusing on the OI area that have been written by Americans. Many of the 50+ plus fictions about OI, in which factual historical consideration is largely absent, have been written by Americans, though. The known factual history of the area is not a mystery, and it does not have to be theorized. That should be the framework on which any explanation of events at OI are built. As far as I'm aware efforts to present the OI story in terms of the limited factual History are not found in popular fiction or speculative story telling/crafting. Instead, what we often find are attempts to fuse legends with romanticized ideas of what colonial NS was, or could have been like, often assuming very incorrect things. Many, and I mean many, have based their ideas on romanticized notions of what colonial life was like in the 19th century pirate story literature that was popular in America. Many of the supposed possible theories about OI are immediately dismissible by the realization that Europeans were living just off shore there much earlier than many are willing to acknowledge. The scant British colonial History of NS is also highly misunderstood. There's isn't a whole lot of it prior to the Deportation outside of the few garrisoned areas. It should be alarming to many who think there's a legitimate start to this story when all we have are details that can be shown to have been borrowed from accounts from other places. What places the mystery at OI are the searcher efforts there, and there is every reason to believe that a manipulation was done in order to have them happen there on land owned by the people doing the suggesting. If the evocative details given in stories were enough then searches would have necessarily occurred elsewhere (where the borrowed OI story details originated from), as the local historian DesBrisay expressed. The details never mattered as much as the searches themselves. It is the fact that people searched there that has convinced so many, after the fact, that there ought to have been a reason for that to happen there. I invite anyone to produce a reason why searches should have occurred where they did without the benefit of knowing what came later. The Truro group acted upon a suggestion made to them, likely originating from the relation to the Vaughn family member, and the unconditional acceptance of any suggestion is a belief in that thing. Once you hold a belief everything else is made to conform to it. It is not our jobs to make ourselves fall in line with anyone's beliefs. We can face the same suggestions as others did and choose to not unconditionally accept them. Efforts to chronicle the OI story by starting with the searcher era are jumping the shark. That is itself is not a starting point to know we are dealing with historical certainties. What is of prime importance is the understanding of what happened to have that happen there.
 

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