Shopkeeper said they are garden ornaments...

Medz

Newbie
Aug 12, 2022
3
5
The shopkeeper insisted that I buy these garden ornaments along with my other finds. Since I only needed to add $3, I relented. When I got home, I found out that the platform has a tomoe symbol at the bottom. And the rock is unusually heavy but non-magnetic. I think I just got myself a hammerstone, but not sure what the platform is supposed to be. Can anyone help me identify these two? Thank you very much in advance.
 

Attachments

  • 20220812_210420.jpg
    20220812_210420.jpg
    688.6 KB · Views: 49
  • 20220812_154729.jpg
    20220812_154729.jpg
    852.1 KB · Views: 42
  • 20220812_154718.jpg
    20220812_154718.jpg
    653.4 KB · Views: 36
  • 20220812_154706.jpg
    20220812_154706.jpg
    523.5 KB · Views: 35
  • 20220812_154654.jpg
    20220812_154654.jpg
    480.8 KB · Views: 33
  • 20220812_154644.jpg
    20220812_154644.jpg
    463.7 KB · Views: 37
  • 20220812_154624.jpg
    20220812_154624.jpg
    589.4 KB · Views: 48
  • 20220812_210516.jpg
    20220812_210516.jpg
    635.8 KB · Views: 45
  • 20220812_205847.jpg
    20220812_205847.jpg
    787.6 KB · Views: 48
  • 20220812_205921.jpg
    20220812_205921.jpg
    881.7 KB · Views: 45

Butter Hat

Sr. Member
Apr 6, 2014
359
222
In ur innerwebz
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
The shopkeeper insisted that I buy these garden ornaments along with my other finds. Since I only needed to add $3, I relented. When I got home, I found out that the platform has a tomoe symbol at the bottom. And the rock is unusually heavy but non-magnetic. I think I just got myself a hammerstone, but not sure what the platform is supposed to be. Can anyone help me identify these two? Thank you very much in advance.
Tomoe symbol? I haven't seen this before; can you explain?
 

chub

Bronze Member
Apr 23, 2017
1,488
2,220
Detector(s) used
Fisher F75, Minelab Soveriegn XS 2
Nokta pinpointer
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Yes, a very realistic bust of the president
 

Red-Coat

Silver Member
Dec 23, 2019
3,593
11,169
Surrey, UK
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Welcome to Tnet.

The Tomoe symbol can have between one and four commas. When there are three, it’s called a “mitsu-domoe” and most usually associated with Japanese Shintoism. I would think your ‘stand’ was a garden/outdoor shrine that housed a small statue; a plant/bonsai; or, more commonly, a lantern.

I don’t think the other stone is related to it. The Japanese attach cultural significance to all kinds of stones, such as Suiseki and Gongshi, and use them for decorative purpose in gardens and elsewhere… but usually because they have a natural shape that’s suggestive of something or an enigmatic abstract shape/texture/colouration. No idea if that’s the case here or if it’s just a stone.
 
OP
M

Medz

Newbie
Aug 12, 2022
3
5
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #6
Tomoe symbol? I haven't seen this before; can you explain?
This is what I have learned about it so far based on what I've seen on the net:

Tomoe (巴, also written 鞆絵),[a] commonly translated as "comma", is a comma-like swirl symbol used in Japanese mon (roughly equivalent to a heraldic badge or charge in European heraldry). It closely resembles the usual form of a magatama.

The tomoe appears in many designs with various uses. The simplest, most common patterns of the device contain from one to four tomoe, and are reminiscent of similar designs that have been found in wide distribution around the world. When circumscribed in a circle, it often appears in a set of three, with this design known as the mitsudomoe (三ツ巴).

Some view the mitsudomoe as representative of the threefold division (Man, Earth, and Sky) at the heart of the Shinto religion. Originally, it was associated with the Shinto war deity Hachiman, and through that was adopted by the samurai as their traditional symbol.

It is also commonly displayed on banners and lanterns used in festivals and rituals related to Amaterasu-ōmikami, who in the Kojiki confronts her brother Susanoo when he usurps her terrain on earth by dressing as an archer, adorned with magatama beads and 'an awesome high arm-guard' (itu nö takatömö).

A third element of its symbolic panorama concerns water, an association engendered by its swirling pattern. For this reason, it is said to be located on roofs and gables as a charm against fire.

The mitsudomoe symbol once signified the three treasures of Buddha.
 
OP
M

Medz

Newbie
Aug 12, 2022
3
5
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #7
Welcome to Tnet.

The Tomoe symbol can have between one and four commas. When there are three, it’s called a “mitsu-domoe” and most usually associated with Japanese Shintoism. I would think your ‘stand’ was a garden/outdoor shrine that housed a small statue; a plant/bonsai; or, more commonly, a lantern.

I don’t think the other stone is related to it. The Japanese attach cultural significance to all kinds of stones, such as Suiseki and Gongshi, and use them for decorative purpose in gardens and elsewhere… but usually because they have a natural shape that’s suggestive of something or an enigmatic abstract shape/texture/colouration. No idea if that’s the case here or if it’s just a stone.
I also think that the stone and the platform are originally together. Maybe the shopkeeper just put them together to sell them faster. I'm thinking perhaps the platform isn't a platform as assumed by the shopkeeper but actually a roof decor? Some temples would have that on their roofs in Japan. Anyway, I was just curious...not a loss at all for $3. 😅😁
 

UnderMiner

Silver Member
Jul 27, 2014
3,407
7,858
New York City
🥇 Banner finds
2
Detector(s) used
Minelab Excalibur II, Ace 250
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
It's not a shrine, it's called a "kawara" and it's a traditional Japanese roofing tile also called a barrel tile. It may actually be ancient, best consult an expert from Japan or some university skilled in dating these beautiful pieces of art.
0ef384d8d83ceef6c66d353362b8b291.jpg
 

Top Member Reactions

Users who are viewing this thread

Top