Spoon of Mystery....

bmccombs

Jr. Member
Dec 6, 2020
54
278
Union City, Michigan
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Nokta Makro Simplex
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Slow day, but....I did get a spoon for my spoon collection. Says......"Sons & CC Nickel Silver" Not sure if there is a preceding name before "Sons" if there is I sure can't make it out. It has a little fluke shaped feature on the end of the handle, but it is very faint.

Any hoo....At least I didn't get skunked...... Capturespoon.GIF

IMG_20210906_194304124_2.jpg
IMG_20210906_193844686.jpg
 
Upvote 12

Gene Mean

Bronze Member
Dec 22, 2016
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Central NJ
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Equinox 800
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There is something b4 SONS. Nice spoon though.
 

Red-Coat

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Dec 23, 2019
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Surrey, UK
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The spoon is a generic fiddleback, and those generally don’t feature in the pattern books since almost every flatware company made them from about 1820 onwards. ‘Nickel silver’ (which is a copper/nickel/zinc alloy containing no actual silver) didn’t come into usage until the 1830s as unplated metal and then as electroplate in the 1840s.

I think you’ll find it says “XXXXX SONS & CO” and while there could be small and obscure undocumented companies to whom such a mark could be attributed, there’s only one mainstream company as a possibility (assuming the spoon is American): W.H. Glenny, Sons & Co. who used this mark between c1865-1898:

Glenny.jpg

William Glenny was an importer, wholesaler and retailer of glassware, crockery and flatware established in Buffalo NY in 1840, but his sons weren’t added as business partners until c.1865. The company went on to become one of the largest tableware importers in the US and their own mark was applied to goods produced for them. They went out of business in 1898.
 

DizzyDigger

Silver Member
Dec 9, 2012
4,934
9,072
Concrete, WA
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Nokta FoRs Gold, a Gold Cube, 2 Keene Sluices and Lord only knows how many pans....not to mention a load of other gear my wife still doesn't know about!
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Prospecting
Tried to rework the image to see if any letters or numbers
could be brought out..

IMG_20210906_193844686-2.jpg

There are definitely letters and/or numbers preceding "Sons",
and as best I can see there are no "X"'s. Last letter appears
to be a T.
 

Red-Coat

Silver Member
Dec 23, 2019
2,929
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Surrey, UK
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Tried to rework the image to see if any letters or numbers
could be brought out..

View attachment 1946183

There are definitely letters and/or numbers preceding "Sons",
and as best I can see there are no "X"'s. Last letter appears
to be a T.


When I said “XXXXX SONS & CO”, I was just using the Xs to signify an unknown number of indeterminate characters. I wasn't suggesting that any of those characters might actually be an X.

In terms of company marks on flatware, W.H. Glenny, Sons & Co. was the only documented mainstream American business who used a mark ending "... SONS & CO" as far as I am aware. I would be sure it's one of their spoons and - hopefully - that last letter will prove to be a 'Y' not a 'T'.
 

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