Super Panner Build

Jim in Idaho

Silver Member
Jul 21, 2012
3,324
4,718
Blackfoot, Idaho
Detector(s) used
White's GM2, GM3, DFX, Coinmaster, TDI-SL, GM24K, Falcon MD20, old Garrett Masterhunter BFO
'Way Too Cool' dual 18 Watt UV light
Primary Interest:
Prospecting
Obviously, the text I attached had a bit of info on the Super Panner. Keep in mind, it is a "batch" machine, not continuous like a shaker table. Second is that it is not made to give a mostly-clean result. it's more like a pre-concentrator. The theory appears to be the side-to-side motion causes the heavies to settle to the bottom of the pile at the feed (lower) end. The fore-and-aft motion causes the lighter material to move towards the upper end where it goes into tails. At the end of the batch it appears to leave a pile of heavy material, which has gold, heavy black sand, and other heavy constituents in it. That material can then be classified and sent to a shaker table for further recovery of valuables. The BGS was using it to raise the concentration of gold in the material they were testing their shaker table on. Not saying it isn't useful....but probably affordable only in a commercial operation. And probably difficult for the average Joe, or Jane, to DIY. One thing I got from seeing that is the idea of a heavy-shake bucket to settle the gold, and then scraping off the top 80%, before running the remainder on a shaker table...
Maybe.
Jim
 

Upvote 4

Assembler

Silver Member
May 10, 2017
3,176
1,248
Detector(s) used
Whites, Fisher, Garrett, and Falcon.
Primary Interest:
Prospecting
Obviously, the text I attached had a bit of info on the Super Panner. Keep in mind, it is a "batch" machine, not continuous like a shaker table. Second is that it is not made to give a mostly-clean result. it's more like a pre-concentrator. The theory appears to be the side-to-side motion causes the heavies to settle to the bottom of the pile at the feed (lower) end. The fore-and-aft motion causes the lighter material to move towards the upper end where it goes into tails. At the end of the batch it appears to leave a pile of heavy material, which has gold, heavy black sand, and other heavy constituents in it. That material can then be classified and sent to a shaker table for further recovery of valuables. The BGS was using it to raise the concentration of gold in the material they were testing their shaker table on. Not saying it isn't useful....but probably affordable only in a commercial operation. And probably difficult for the average Joe, or Jane, to DIY. One thing I got from seeing that is the idea of a heavy-shake bucket to settle the gold, and then scraping off the top 80%, before running the remainder on a shaker table...
Maybe.
Jim
This approach will be the most productive and save the most time I like it.

The core principle concept take away that I see is the longer spread out strokes gives a different effect / result on a given batch of materials.

I'm thinking that the laboratory grade level superpan shake treatment is more for figuring out what concentrations there is of other types of heavies there is in a given sample test. This is done to see if it is worth the time to extract other materials / metals to get reasonable returns on the time spent.

The down side factor of this approach is that a centrifuge is way faster to get like results thus much better returns on the effort and time spent to extract other materials / metals. The centrifuge method is within reach of many people in costs and time spent for reasonable returns.
 

Assembler

Silver Member
May 10, 2017
3,176
1,248
Detector(s) used
Whites, Fisher, Garrett, and Falcon.
Primary Interest:
Prospecting
Still I could consider a supperpanner style pan if the parts come easy. The other day I found a stainless steel open ended tray if folded in the center could be a simple pan only about 14 - 18" long. Very light weight so will not need much of a slow long stroke motor. Just thinking about it so far.
Just a back burner idea right now.
 

Assembler

Silver Member
May 10, 2017
3,176
1,248
Detector(s) used
Whites, Fisher, Garrett, and Falcon.
Primary Interest:
Prospecting
Well building a number of "Super pans" will be called for depending on what you want to accomplish with a given batch process as well as the particle shape and size goes.

I found a nice 24" stainless steel lid that should make a very nice single batch pan mounted on a very long stroke mechanical base.

I'm thinking that only 10-15 seconds will be needed to move the heavies down to the bottom with a hand squeegee of the tailings / ragging's remove after each shake cycle to make this a very fast process.
 

Assembler

Silver Member
May 10, 2017
3,176
1,248
Detector(s) used
Whites, Fisher, Garrett, and Falcon.
Primary Interest:
Prospecting
My research is telling me that the 'Superpanner' has a range of 4 holes that gives about 2" to 4" stroke length in about 1/2" size changes on the different holes.

I'm thinking of going to around 10"-12" stroke length with only about 1 to 1 1/2 strokes per second max speed for a 24" pan size.
 

Last edited:

Assembler

Silver Member
May 10, 2017
3,176
1,248
Detector(s) used
Whites, Fisher, Garrett, and Falcon.
Primary Interest:
Prospecting
I like the idea of a light fold in the center of a large aluminum baking pan for the foundation of a flatter 'Superpanner'. Maybe run two or more pans together for a longer spread out of the materials.
 

Top Member Reactions

Users who are viewing this thread

Top