The Templar Fortress of Mystery?

Crow

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Gidday amigos

Out of all the Templar treasure legends. The following story is an intriguing one. Is there any truth to the following tale or is it a latter day lost Templar treasure fantasy?

Hardly known by English speaking aficionados of all things Templar. The yarn has revived little interest from pseudo quasi historians outside of France.

Mainly because I do think there has been a written English version of story behind the this amazing Templar site.

So my apologies in advance with the English translation of the story.

chateau-de-arigny-69_a.jpg

Today the property is privately owned with a working farm next a 15th century chateau hunting lodge built upon the ruins of 12 century Templar Fortress that was one belonged to one of the most ardent Templar knights who died defending the siege of Acres.

The place looks almost lost and forgotten in the sleepy rural French countryside.

chateau-de-arigny-69_c.jpg

Regardless the site has an amazing history.

Crow
 
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Gidday amigos

Guillaume de Beaujeu, aka William of Beaujeu (c. 1230 – 1291) was the 21st Grand Master of the Knights Templar, from 1273 until his death during the siege of Acre in 1291. He was the last Grand Master to preside in Palestine. Here is his coat of arms below. Notice the Templar crosses.

1200px-Armoiries_Guillaume_de_Beaujeu small.jpg

At one point during the siege, he dropped his sword and walked away from the walls. His knights remonstrated. Beaujeu replied: "Je ne m'enfuis pas; je suis mort. Voici le coup." ("I'm not running away; I am dead. Here is the blow.") He raised his arm to show the mortal wound he had received - an arrow had penetrated his mail under his armpit so that only the fletches were visible. Beaujeu died of his wound and the city fell to the Mamluks, signalling the end of Crusader occupation of the Holy Land.

Interest in Arginy regarding the Temple treasury is related to Master William de Beaujeu, a member of the family which owned the area from the thirteenth to fourteenth century. Guillaume de Beaujeu, as explained in particular Dupuy in his “History of the Templars” of 1653, was originally buried in Saint-Jean d’Acre. Then returned to France, his remains were deposited in the Temple of Paris.

There was speculation that Templar treasure and remains of Guichard of Beaujeu passed through Chateau de Arginy on the way to the temple in Paris

This is where the mystery begins, and the treasure hunt is later launched amigos

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Who were the original owners of the castle?

chateau-de-arigny-69_p - Copie.jpg

The regional archives have not surviving records prior 1253. But in 1253, Louis de Beaujeu, the lord of the whole valley, chose to leave the family castle and moved to Arginy. His descendants will also Arginy their main residence, Guichard VI Grand master knight templar in 1295.

Edward 1st in 1331, Antoinnette of Beaujeu in 1343. Then some time later appears Vernet family who had some land in the town of Charentay. They will increase their area by acquiring the farm in 1365 Arginy, then in 1388 the castle and all its lands.

Throughout the fifteenth century, as successive owners of the premises, Guichard II Vernet (1422), Thomas de Vernet (1430), Jacqueline de Chalon (1453), Thomas de la Bussiere (1485).

Sometime after ( 1491 ) the castle was acquired by Anne of France (or Anne de Beaujeu; 3 April 1461 – 14 November 1522) was a French princess and regent, the eldest daughter of Louis XI by Charlotte of Savoy. Anne was the sister of Charles VIII, for whom she acted as regent during his minority from 1483 until 1491. During the regency she was one of the most powerful women of late fifteenth-century Europe, and was referred to as "Madame la Grande"

330px-Anne_Beaujeu.jpg

Anne inherited a great deal of her intelligence from her father, King Louis XI and was very like him temperamentally. Louis described Anne as the least foolish of her sex in the kingdom of France which contained no wise ones. She was known as Madame la Grande (Grand Madam) and although King Louis never named her official regent.

Anne was recognized by the French court and by foreign emissaries as the true ruler of France until her brother declared his independence and she retired to her estates. During the eight years she controlled the government, she adroitly managed to guide the country through a series of political crises that threatened France from within and without.


Anne of France (Anne de Beaujeu), daughter of Louis XI, had during her time as regent had discovered state papers from King Phillip the fairs time. One document Pertained to Templar treasure hidden at Chateau De Arginy. Anne who was in the process of remodeling the old castle into a hunting lodge had carried out searches in the dungeon of the castle with the hope of finding the treasure.


Her search, according to tradition, ended tragically. One of her workers who had descended into a pit, suddenly uttered a dreadful cry that frightened his comrades remained in the open air. The man came out of the gallery, however, about one quarter of an hour later, he walked like a robot, with his skull crushed fragments from which emerged brains.


Arrived in front of his superstitious companions, he spread his arms and finally fell. They felt along his body already cold and, finding the latter “diabolical”, refused to resume work to flee in terror.

And so ended Anne's search for treasure in such a superstitious time.

Was the story true or the makings of another treasure legend?

One thing for such the story of Templar treasure did not die...Amigos

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Anne died in 1522.

In 1533, Claude King Francis Vignolles bought the first right of justice enjoyed by Beaujeu two centuries earlier. The castle was restored and enlarged, then the farm is built.

chateau-de-arigny-69_s.jpg


In 1576, Antoinette Vignolles continued expansion of the field by acquiring more land. In 1883 the family became owner of Rosemont eight hundred acres of land and the castle of Arginy. Rosemont was one of the best families of the French nobility. Their stronghold, in the fourteenth century, was located in Figeac .


In 1883, ownership was Arginy Chambrun of Uxeloup Rosemont. Around 1900, Count Pierre de Rosemont began excavations to turn to find the treasure of the Templars. He cleared a vertical gallery in which one of his workmen down at the end of a cable…. His descent ended in an accident just as tragic as before: the man had his foot crushed by a kind of articulated wheel ..

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- D69Argigif1.gif


By 1950 the story takes a a rather bizarre turn.....When pseudo historians occultists make baseless allegations.

Sound familiar?.....

This is where fantasy takes over from the known facts a very common factor in treasure legends.

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1953, when Jacques de Rosemont was still alive, a team of occultists, mediums and investigators determined undertook with the consent and support of Rosemont, to tackle the mystery and its Arginy Templar treasure. There was Jacques Breyer, writer and esotericism, Armand Barbault, alchemist, and his wife, remarkable medium, Maxime Roquemaure, Mr. and Mrs. Michon, Beaujeu, Claude Cariven, filmmaker, Mr. Champion and many others. All these scientists indulged in occult number of experiments spiritualist invocations night, some of which were particularly spectacular. The “contact” was established, it seems, with eleven entities Templar, guarding the treasure, and not willing to indicate access!


Works occult and excavations continued for some time. Then as numerous and varied incidents came the disturbing gradually.One after the other, the visitors left Arginy. The old feudal building soon found silence.


Not for long. All that France has occultists, Hermetics, mediums, magicians and other alchemists marched to Arginy. As researchers illegal, it is virtually impossible to estimate the number how many they were, for thirty years, to enter the field, handling the pendulum or dynamite, sounding every stone, searching every inch of land


In a work as strange and exciting, published in 1973 by Robert Laffont, Time out of time, Gabrielle Carmi, medium and expert in comparative religion Kabbalah, the mystery of Arginy recovery while providing new details on it it. The treasure is a chest containing a collection of parchment making, state capitals of revelations on a variety of subjects, the work of insiders Temple. ( here we go tinfoil on the hat brigade)


However, Arginy has still not officially at least, revealed its secret. So why intense interest of researchers from very different backgrounds, to this place?

Then is an alleged Schiffmann document that relates Jacques de Molay, expressing the unfairness of the trial concluded that there was no hope, either for himself or for the Order. He brought near him, just days before his execution, the Count of Beaujeu's nephew, “which had long shown a decided to enter the Order, initiated him into the mysteries”


This document then states: “As soon as Jacques de Molay was expired, Beaujeu proceeded to carry out its commitments. He secured nine knights that escaped the fury of persecution and torture of terror, he mixed his blood with that of his brothers and vowed to spread the Order on the globe as he would be perfect nine architects.


He went to ask the King Philip’s permission to remove the tomb of the Grand Master Grand Master’s coffin Beaujeu his paternal uncle’s predecessor Molay and having obtained it, he went with his brothers in the tomb of the great masters and drove off the coffin that instead of ashes of his uncle the coffin contained money, which has been mentioned. ”

He also removed the treasures contained in the two columns and transport, all to a safe place. ”

Reference source came from claims from S A Schiffmann in 1760. a German Freemason. There is no historic reference source where this information came from.



( This alleged event mentioned in the Schiffmann document lead to the belief or later conspiracy theorists that Templars fled to Nova Scotia via Scotland etc... )


In France it led Esotericists and treasure hunters assumed that this “place of safety” could be that Arginy Castle, located on the lands of the former estate of Beaujeu. However, it should be noted qu’Arginy was at the time a dependency of the Temple: the real castle was Beaujeu and it will be destroyed by the revolutionaries.

But what does the real documents actually say amigos?

Did Anne of France actually search for treasure at chateau de Arginy?

Was the Templar treasure actually taken in the first place?

Those questions proposed the first task is to get back to the real documents and not rely on hysterical claims of pseudo historians and conspiracy theorist countless books claiming all manner of crap.

Crow
 
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The key amigos

Was to search for the actual documents from the main players.

King Phillip IV of France.

Pope Clement V.

William of Beaujeu.

Anne de Beaujeu ( Anne of France )

They amigos was the main players around this treasure legend.

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Gidday Amigos.

That all well and good searching for such documents but would one even be able to understand what is actually being said of the said documents.

Old French (franceis, françois, romanz; Modern French: ancien français) was the language spoken in Northern France from the 8th century to the 14th century. Rather than a unified language, Old French was really a linkage of Romance dialects, mutually intelligible yet diverse, spoken in the northern half of France.


In the 14th century, these dialects came to be collectively known as the langue d'oïl, contrasting with the langue d'oc in the south of France. During the mid-14th century, one of the dialects of Old French, namely Francien from Île-de-France area, transitioned to Middle French, the language of the French Renaissance – itself a predecessor to modern French.

As for other components of Old French, they evolved into various modern languages (Poitevin-Saintongeais, Gallo, Norman, Picard, Walloon, etc.), each with its own linguistic features and history.


The region where Old French was spoken natively roughly extended to the northern half of the Kingdom of France and its vassals (including parts of the Angevin Empire, which during the 12th century remained under Anglo-Norman rule), and the duchies of Upper and Lower Lorraine to the east (corresponding to modern north-eastern France and Belgian Wallonia), but the influence of Old French was much wider, as it was carried to England and the Crusader states as the language of a feudal elite and commerce.

Yep few people realize the English kings and court did not speak what we know of English until the 1530's When old English of commoner the Anglo Saxon language merged with old French into Old English.

Worse still even a fluent French Speaker today would struggle with old French just like and English Speaker today would struggle with old English.

That as you can see creates a challenge amigos.

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KANACKI

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Gidday Amigos.

That all well and good searching for such documents but would one even be able to understand what is actually being said of the said documents.

Old French (franceis, françois, romanz; Modern French: ancien français) was the language spoken in Northern France from the 8th century to the 14th century. Rather than a unified language, Old French was really a linkage of Romance dialects, mutually intelligible yet diverse, spoken in the northern half of France.


In the 14th century, these dialects came to be collectively known as the langue d'oïl, contrasting with the langue d'oc in the south of France. During the mid-14th century, one of the dialects of Old French, namely Francien from Île-de-France area, transitioned to Middle French, the language of the French Renaissance – itself a predecessor to modern French.

As for other components of Old French, they evolved into various modern languages (Poitevin-Saintongeais, Gallo, Norman, Picard, Walloon, etc.), each with its own linguistic features and history.


The region where Old French was spoken natively roughly extended to the northern half of the Kingdom of France and its vassals (including parts of the Angevin Empire, which during the 12th century remained under Anglo-Norman rule), and the duchies of Upper and Lower Lorraine to the east (corresponding to modern north-eastern France and Belgian Wallonia), but the influence of Old French was much wider, as it was carried to England and the Crusader states as the language of a feudal elite and commerce.

Yep few people realize the English kings and court did not speak what we know of English until the 1530's When old English of commoner the Anglo Saxon language merged with old French into Old English.

Worse still even a fluent French Speaker today would struggle with old French just like and English Speaker today would struggle with old English.

That as you can see creates a challenge amigos.

Crow

Hola Crow


Also the shear volume to deal with of documents to search. Not an easy task.

Kanacki
 
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True but not if we get help?

Question is how many people would be interested here in helping to search through documents looking for key words that might uncover interesting information about Templar treasure from original documents.

You could say they are actually participating in a search for "Templar" treasure from the comfort of their own home.

There must be enough people reading this deeply interested in Templars?

And about the fate of the alleged treasure?

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KANACKI

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True but not if we get help?

Question is how many people would be interested here in helping to search through documents looking for key words that might uncover interesting information about Templar treasure from original documents.

You could say they are actually participating in a search for "Templar" treasure from the comfort of their own home.

There must be enough people reading this deeply interested in Templars?

And about the fate of the alleged treasure?

Crow

I can see what your getting at? That would be cool instead of the usual slugfest they could help uncover important information lock away in the document by visually searching for various words like Templar and treasure? But it can be spelled in Old French.

Of course the more people looking for those key words in old french will help narrow down the rel-vent pages that might have valuable information on the Templars.

But how would stop it from descending into chaos?

Kanacki
 
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Gidday Kanacki

All they have to do is look at every word looking for a matching letters to the words Templar and treasure in old French.

If they think they see anything all they have to do is say the page number and what line from the top. The more people looking the more effective the word search is.

Of course all they need to do is like math the letter to the appropriate old french Spelling of Templar.

But amigo it very late I will discuss it further.

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KANACKI

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Gidday Kanacki

All they have to do is look at every word looking for a matching letters to the words Templar and treasure in old French.

If they think they see anything all they have to do is say the page number and what line from the top. The more people looking the more effective the word search is.

Of course all they need to do is like math the letter to the appropriate old french Spelling of Templar.

But amigo it very late I will discuss it further.

Crow

Very interesting idea.

Perhaps insane but might be brilliant.

Kanacki
 

BillA

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Crow
little point in observing that the first hot air balloons were French
(or Russian???)

so the investigators will be somewhat knowledgeable in the various cursive forms of Old French?
but a single "miss" would potentially undo everything?
I admire the goal but the odds seem terrible

nice addition to the treasure hunter's travel log
 

KANACKI

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Hola Bill Amigo

Working against terrible odds are the trios specialty. Its called tenacity. Too many people have comfortable lives with out ever having to push themselves further beyond their own expectations..

There are people who think they are treasure hunters then there are the hardcore. The ones that it is not a dream but way of life than many would never dare to follow. Some times you have to push yourself with massive efforts and get very little results from those efforts. But each one of those efforts you can learn from them and get better for it.

There is an old saying "How do you eat an elephant? by one little bite at a time!

While the Templar legends are not a key project for us, Its is an excellent "research exercise training tool". Hardluck schooled us very well. In searching for real documents, not relying on claims by pseudo authors that have just copies from other pseudo authors. We always try to get to earliest reference or documents in regards to treasure.

I suspect Crows Idea after looking through the documents and a Old french dictionary and cursive hand writing you can make out the letters of a possible key word on old French.

Crow would give the old french spelling version to look for. From experience looking for documents key word does have its risks but time and time again Hardluck used that technique to speed read through thousands of documents identifying pages worth closer inspection. With fantastic results.

But that is from a earnest seeker. But of just ordinary people on a forum?

It comes down to who has the drive Amigo.

Who has the curiosity to make dedicated search?

Who has the discipline to persevere?

Kanacki
 
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Gidday Kanacki

I can see the problem that lack of interest in making any effort as any effort might not yield any results at all. But that is research amigos.

Crow
 

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