Two Nondescript Colonial Coppers

Eastender

Sr. Member
Mar 30, 2020
337
1,973
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Today I found the upper left and upper middle coppers from an area which was my region's first colonial settlement in 1650. In my hand is a collection of coin-like objects that I have found in this specific area within the past two years. They were all found in dry soil, isolates not associated with debris fields. The first Puritans that shifted into my area from CT colony probably didn't have much material wealth and practiced austere lifestyles. It's tough to find traces of them and I spend many long days searching. In the larger area I have found KG I, II, III along with Rosa Americana, clustered in iron nail fields, my earliest dates being 1723 and 1724. I jokingly refer to these coins as proto-currency. Metals hold up well in our well-drained soils and these appear to worn smooth from usage as opposed to in ground corrosion. The upper ones are quite thin. The upper middle almost appears to have a thin black coating with fine quartz grit applied, maybe not a coin but an abrasive tool. I believe the thick one in the lower right is a gold-silver alloy. It weighs exactly one troy ounce. That's how it came out of the ground around 4" deep.
 

Attachments

  • tres265.jpg
    tres265.jpg
    710.5 KB · Views: 68
Upvote 5

Florida Finder

Bronze Member
Dec 17, 2020
1,541
4,385
Southern States of America
🥇 Banner finds
1
Detector(s) used
AT Max
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
Today I found the upper left and upper middle coppers from an area which was my region's first colonial settlement in 1650. In my hand is a collection of coin-like objects that I have found in this specific area within the past two years. They were all found in dry soil, isolates not associated with debris fields. The first Puritans that shifted into my area from CT colony probably didn't have much material wealth and practiced austere lifestyles. It's tough to find traces of them and I spend many long days searching. In the larger area I have found KG I, II, III along with Rosa Americana, clustered in iron nail fields, my earliest dates being 1723 and 1724. I jokingly refer to these coins as proto-currency. Metals hold up well in our well-drained soils and these appear to worn smooth from usage as opposed to in ground corrosion. The upper ones are quite thin. The upper middle almost appears to have a thin black coating with fine quartz grit applied, maybe not a coin but an abrasive tool. I believe the thick one in the lower right is a gold-silver alloy. It weighs exactly one troy ounce. That's how it came out of the ground around 4" deep.
Looks like you got a hand full of coppers. Congratulations on a great hunt!
 

Digger RJ

Gold Member
Aug 24, 2017
15,851
27,655
SW Missouri/Oklahoma
🥇 Banner finds
1
🏆 Honorable Mentions:
2
Detector(s) used
Minelab CTX 3030; Minelab Equinox 800;
XP Deus 2
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Today I found the upper left and upper middle coppers from an area which was my region's first colonial settlement in 1650. In my hand is a collection of coin-like objects that I have found in this specific area within the past two years. They were all found in dry soil, isolates not associated with debris fields. The first Puritans that shifted into my area from CT colony probably didn't have much material wealth and practiced austere lifestyles. It's tough to find traces of them and I spend many long days searching. In the larger area I have found KG I, II, III along with Rosa Americana, clustered in iron nail fields, my earliest dates being 1723 and 1724. I jokingly refer to these coins as proto-currency. Metals hold up well in our well-drained soils and these appear to worn smooth from usage as opposed to in ground corrosion. The upper ones are quite thin. The upper middle almost appears to have a thin black coating with fine quartz grit applied, maybe not a coin but an abrasive tool. I believe the thick one in the lower right is a gold-silver alloy. It weighs exactly one troy ounce. That's how it came out of the ground around 4" deep.
Nice!!!! Congrats!!!!
 

Top Member Reactions

Users who are viewing this thread

We Dig Metal Detectors
Top