Various Pottery Fragments - Identifications?

Elam

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Jun 20, 2013
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Over the years I've dug up many different fragments of dishes and pottery from a long-gone farmhouse. I've identified much of it as Blue Willow dishware, a 1915 Limoges calendar plate and purple transferware by Wooliscroft (Eon pattern), but there are still many fragments that I have not been able to confidently name as far as the pattern or maker. Do any of these patterns look familiar to you?

Below are some of my findings, including the Eon purple transferware plate by Wooliscroft. Also, one is the bottom of a dish with the maker's mark, but there was no pattern on the other side.

I found the two pieces with the red and green geometric design over the course of quite a few years. If you notice, though the green shapes seem to border the red circle in the center of the plate, they veer off at one point which makes me curious whether it was really a red circle in the middle...?

Any idea what companies made the teacup and the creamer? There is no mark on the bottoms of either of them.

I look forward to your suggestions.
 

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DCMatt

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Is this a picture of the pitcher?

ca9e7a5e6f9d5d2d540b8794c681408e.jpg

Found it on Pinterest. Not much info... 19th C Staffordshire Octagonal
 

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Elam

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That one is a larger pitcher (mine is more of a creamer - about 7" tall) and the picture on it is different, too, however the design is very similar. I'm sure it must be the same company. Thanks for the lead!
 

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smokeythecat

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It's all 19th century. Mostly made in England and imported.
 

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Elam

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19th Century?

It's all 19th century. Mostly made in England and imported.

How can you tell if it's all 19th century? I know people lived in the homeinto the 1930's, so perhaps some of it is from the early 20th century...?
 

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Elam

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I've seen where others knew specific names for old plate patterns (e.g. "Eon"). Is there a book or website like this I could use as help? Where do people find the specific names for their plate patterns?
 

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Itsmine

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"Kovels" Book of Marks is online. You can find thousands of marks listed. You need to find the makers before you find the patterns. Trying to find a pattern without the maker is like literally " looking for a needle in a haystack". You can try searching for china or stoneware patterns then looking at images to see if any pop up. ......Here's the link for Kovels. https://www.kovels.com/marks/pottery-porcelain-marks.html
 

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Elam

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"Kovels" Book of Marks is online. You can find thousands of marks listed. You need to find the makers before you find the patterns. Trying to find a pattern without the maker is like literally " looking for a needle in a haystack". You can try searching for china or stoneware patterns then looking at images to see if any pop up. ......Here's the link for Kovels. https://www.kovels.com/marks/pottery-porcelain-marks.html

Thank you! That will be a great reference, I'm sure. For some of the pieces I have been able to find similar looking plates, so that could be something to start with anyway.
 

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Elam

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I have identified the red transferware fragment as a piece by Edge Malkin & Co. It is called the Como pattern and this particular one was from an Italian series of dishes. Pretty interesting to see the whole picture!

Here's a picture of a complete one. Como Pattern - Edge Malkin and Co - Italy Series.jpg
 

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Elam

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Oh, and this one is circa 1871-1891.
 

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Elam

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The black and white piece appears to also be from an Edge Malkin & Co. plate and it is in the Corella pattern from around 1870!

corrella_plate.jpg
 

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smokeythecat

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All the patterns and the materials were made in the 19th century, just before the Civil war to very late in the century. Of course, you can easily find some in a 20th century context. For instance, one of my first set of dishes I bought in 1976. I still have them. So my 20th century dishes will be disposed of in the 21st, at the earliest.

I have some dishes in my collection that are 18th century. So if they were to be destroyed they would be discarded in the 21st century. Most of the materials are made of ironstone, which replaced creamware after about 1810. The printing is called transfer printing. It was developed late in time and we still make plates/dinnerware that way.

Elam is correct on his identification. I've also found 18th century redware on Civil War sites.
 

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