Brush Plot?

Goldwasher

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Anyone ever come across a BLM " Brush Plot" monument.

I found one crawling through manzanita. It has a plot number and a two digit number on it. that does not match the section it is in.
Specifically states it is not a corner marker.

I looked it up and can't find any info on a program. From the BLM site.

I thought that it was nugget hunters who had cut brush and stacked Branches. Really old very weathered.

There are a lot of piles and the cuts looked like they were from a large pto implement not chain saws.

As close as i can tell is it was a program to cut down mature sparse manzanita and pines.

So that it could grow back 400 times as thick and burn down half the state when it goes up.

Makes since cause its a government program:dontknow:

Clay any idea how to look up info on this well thought out and applied program...whatever it was?
 
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oneguy

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My first thought was possibly a plot # for the purpose of a timber cruise (method used for determining brd ft of timber on a sizable tract of timber land to be logged). There are several methods used to cruise but they are all basically the same. Basically they run the plots in a strait line maybe 50yards or 100yards apart and within that plot (maybe 20ft dia circle from center) they measure every tree within the cruise plot no matter how big or small to get an average. Once all the plots are measured then they take the overall info and average that amount to determine how many brd ft of timber is on the sale. It's possible they used a prism to measure what trees fell within or out of the cruise...if so a prism needs open air to be used as it's a direct sight type method so brush would indeed need to be cleared to use the prism method type of cruise.....?????

For sheets and giggles...take a compass and maybe head north/south and or east/west and see if you find any other "plots"....????

Basically just like you'd do a drill test for gold on a specific grid system on a large tract. The monument thing is kinda puzzling...most I've ever seen is a stake in the ground with a ribbon on it, maybe #'s....????
 
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Goldwasher

Goldwasher

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My first thought was possibly a plot # for the purpose of a timber cruise (method used for determining brd ft of timber on a sizable tract of timber land to be logged). There are several methods used to cruise but they are all basically the same. Basically they run the plots in a strait line maybe 50yards or 100yards apart and within that plot (maybe 20ft dia circle from center) they measure every tree within the cruise plot no matter how big or small to get an average. Once all the plots are measured then they take the overall info and average that amount to determine how many brd ft of timber is on the sale. It's possible they used a prism to measure what trees fell within or out of the cruise...if so a prism needs open air to be used as it's a direct sight type method so brush would indeed need to be cleared to use the prism method type of cruise.....?????

For sheets and giggles...take a compass and maybe head north/south and or east/west and see if you find any other "plots"....????

Basically just like you'd do a drill test for gold on a specific grid system on a large tract. The monument thing is kinda puzzling...most I've ever seen is a stake in the ground with a ribbon on it, maybe #'s....????

It's BLM and not a "timbered" area. Chaparral. with some pine. Mainly Digger..they don't log digger.

No stumps from previous logging other than the old growth cut down right after the Gold Rush.

Its sheared off old Manzanita and buck brush..acres and acres of it
 

arizau

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Maybe an attempt to create or restore historic grazing land?
 

ratled

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I don't know what it is but I love to see a picture of it any way
ratle
 

Terry Soloman

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Goldwasher

Goldwasher

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I don't know what it is but I love to see a picture of it any way
ratle

KIMG0465(1).JPG One thing I don't get is the #19 It isn't in section 19
 
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Goldwasher

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Thanks terry I did a search too. I found the field guide you shared.

Confirms what i figured a "brush Plot " is .

I was just wondering where you can find the info on certain brush plots when you have the project number.

Like size , specific reason. year the work was performed. Others nearby if any.
 

Terry Soloman

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Pretty complicated stuff!:icon_thumright:
https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1965/upload/fire-effects-monitoring-handbook.pdf
Generating Monitoring Plot LocationsFirst, using the restricted random sampling methoddiscussed below, randomly locate ten monitoring plotsper monitoring type throughout all units proposed forprescribed burning in the next five years. These plotswill provide quantitative information for pilot sampling (see page 43), and will be used to determine theminimum sample size required to meet your monitoring objectives.To disperse your plots across the landscape, use a variant of stratified random sampling called restrictedrandom sampling. This randomization methodensures that your plots are dispersed throughout yourmonitoring type. First, choose the number, n, of sampling units that you will need to meet your monitoringobjective. As a guideline, use an n of 10 for areas thatare small or when the variability of your objective variable(s) is low. For objective variables that are moderately variable, use an n of 20, and for those that arehighly variable, use an n of 30. (These numbers may beadjusted once you have your initial 10 plots installed.)Then divide your monitoring type into n equal portions (see Figure 15). You will then choose at leastthree to five (depending on the likelihood of initial plotrejection, see below) plot location points (PLPs) perportion. Then establish a monitoring plot within eachof these portions (see page 62).Restricted Random SamplingIf you have currently-established plots within a monitoring type that were not chosen with restricted random sampling, follow the above directions, and whenyou divide your monitoring type into equal portions,do so in such a way that each portion only has one preestablished plot within it. You can then concentrateyour plot establishment efforts in those portions without pre-established plots.The likelihood of initial plot rejection depends on several factors: the odds of encountering one of yourrejection criteria (e.g., large rocky areas); how yourmonitoring type is distributed across the landscape(e.g., if the type has a patchy distribution, your PLPsmay not always land in the middle of a patch); the quality of your vegetation maps (i.e., if you have poor quality maps, your PLPs may not always land within thetype); and the quality of your Monitoring type description sheet (FMH-4) (e.g., you may have written a morenarrow biological or physical description than youintended, and as a result the type that you havedescribed only represents a small portion of the fuelvegetation complex that you are sampling). Most ofthis information requires input from field technicians,so initially you will need to make your best guess as tothe likelihood of plot rejection.Figure 15. Using restricted random sampling to generateplot locations.In this example, the monitoring type is first divided into 20 equalportions (notice that portion number 17 is shared between twoburn units, as the two parts of this portion combined is equal inacreage to each of the other portions). Second, within eachportion, random points A–D (PLPs) are placed using one of the
 

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Run-on sentence much? I'd like to buy you an Enter key 8-)
 

Terry Soloman

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Run-on sentence much? I'd like to buy you an Enter key 8-)

I mean, I would laugh, but I think you're trying to insult me for trying to help someone. Oh, wait, my kid brother lives in Idaho, I understand now. :laughing7:
 

delnorter

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GW, the 19 is most likely the first two numerals of the date. Monument caps were pre-stamped with the usual agencey information. The first two numerals of the date (19) were also pre-stamped on the caps for the 1900s, the last two numerals of the year were stamped at the time the monument was set by the person/agency setting it. In this case, for whatever reason this was not done. Why????
 
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Goldwasher

Goldwasher

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Pretty complicated stuff!:icon_thumright:
https://www.nps.gov/orgs/1965/upload/fire-effects-monitoring-handbook.pdf
Generating Monitoring Plot LocationsFirst, using the restricted random sampling methoddiscussed below, randomly locate ten monitoring plotsper monitoring type throughout all units proposed forprescribed burning in the next five years. These plotswill provide quantitative information for pilot sampling (see page 43), and will be used to determine theminimum sample size required to meet your monitoring objectives.To disperse your plots across the landscape, use a variant of stratified random sampling called restrictedrandom sampling. This randomization methodensures that your plots are dispersed throughout yourmonitoring type. First, choose the number, n, of sampling units that you will need to meet your monitoringobjective. As a guideline, use an n of 10 for areas thatare small or when the variability of your objective variable(s) is low. For objective variables that are moderately variable, use an n of 20, and for those that arehighly variable, use an n of 30. (These numbers may beadjusted once you have your initial 10 plots installed.)Then divide your monitoring type into n equal portions (see Figure 15). You will then choose at leastthree to five (depending on the likelihood of initial plotrejection, see below) plot location points (PLPs) perportion. Then establish a monitoring plot within eachof these portions (see page 62).Restricted Random SamplingIf you have currently-established plots within a monitoring type that were not chosen with restricted random sampling, follow the above directions, and whenyou divide your monitoring type into equal portions,do so in such a way that each portion only has one preestablished plot within it. You can then concentrateyour plot establishment efforts in those portions without pre-established plots.The likelihood of initial plot rejection depends on several factors: the odds of encountering one of yourrejection criteria (e.g., large rocky areas); how yourmonitoring type is distributed across the landscape(e.g., if the type has a patchy distribution, your PLPsmay not always land in the middle of a patch); the quality of your vegetation maps (i.e., if you have poor quality maps, your PLPs may not always land within thetype); and the quality of your Monitoring type description sheet (FMH-4) (e.g., you may have written a morenarrow biological or physical description than youintended, and as a result the type that you havedescribed only represents a small portion of the fuelvegetation complex that you are sampling). Most ofthis information requires input from field technicians,so initially you will need to make your best guess as tothe likelihood of plot rejection.Figure 15. Using restricted random sampling to generateplot locations.In this example, the monitoring type is first divided into 20 equalportions (notice that portion number 17 is shared between twoburn units, as the two parts of this portion combined is equal inacreage to each of the other portions). Second, within eachportion, random points A–D (PLPs) are placed using one of the


I'm not really interested in their initial methodlogy..for why a brush plotter...plots..the plots.

I'm interested in the paper trail and data left in its wake... if any.
 
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Goldwasher

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GW, the 19 is most likely the first two numerals of the date. Monument caps were pre-stamped with the usual agencey information. The first two numerals of the date (19) were also pre-stamped on the caps for the 1900s, the last two numerals of the year were stamped at the time the monument was set by the person/agency setting it. In this case, for whatever reason this was not done. Why????

Ahh. that makes sense. lazy *******s:laughing7:
 

Underburden

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I mean, I would laugh, but I think you're trying to insult me for trying to help someone. Oh, wait, my kid brother lives in Idaho, I understand now. :laughing7:

No insult Terry, I'm visually impaired from a second stroke. By the time I read to the end of a sentence I loose my place to start the next line. What do you have against Idaho folks?
 

arizau

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GW, the 19 is most likely the first two numerals of the date. Monument caps were pre-stamped with the usual agencey information. The first two numerals of the date (19) were also pre-stamped on the caps for the 1900s, the last two numerals of the year were stamped at the time the monument was set by the person/agency setting it. In this case, for whatever reason this was not done. Why????

My guess is that they just "re-purposed" regular monument caps rather than designing and contracting for new special survey markers and that date and coordinates were not needed for brush plots.
 
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Goldwasher

Goldwasher

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My guess is that they just "re-purposed" regular monument caps rather than designing and contracting for new special survey markers and that date and coordinates were not needed for brush plots.

No, if you look at it it is specifically not a regular monument cap
 

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