🥇 BANNER Fantastic Bayonet found at our school!

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Kindle Farmers

Kindle Farmers

Jr. Member
Sep 25, 2014
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🥇 Banner finds
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Update: 3/31/16

A couple weeks ago we received and e-mail from Joe Serbaroli, author of European Bayonets of the American Civil War: A Guide to the Imported Bayonets of the Union and Confederacy, Including American-made Bayonets for Foreign Arms. He was able to provide some fantastic new information on our bayonet. While we received great information from members here and through our own research, Mr. Serbaroli offered some corrections and additions.

Our bayonet was manufactured in the city of Liege, in modern day Belgium between 1760 and 1780. Liege was one of the major arms manufacturing centers servicing many European powers and also private merchants. He was able to date the bayonet as being made after 1750 because the mortise (slot) has a 3rd step, as opposed to only 2 steps. The 3rd step or leg was an improvement first noted on French bayonets in the 1750's. A similar example to this Liege-made bayonet was excavated at Fort Ligonier, but has a 2-step mortise typical of the French & Indian War era. This particular bayonet might have been either issued to American colonial troops rather than British regulars during the French and Indian Wars; or it may also have been smuggled in during the American Revolution by a merchant. If it was smuggled in, it would have shipped from Amsterdam or Rotterdam and arrived in Portsmouth, NH as part of the business operations of smugglers like Patriot John Hancock. Once in the colonies, the serial number would have been hand engraved. The D would likely be the company number, and the N 826 would have been the weapon number.
Since our school is situated on a mid-1700's home site first owned by former New Hampshire settlers with a military background, the bayonet probably saw service during the American Revolution. This is not to say it was used in battle, but it would have been in the militia inventory and assigned to a militiaman.


We are currently in the process of building a display case to exhibit the bayonet and other finds from our area.

Also, with the start of 4th Quarter, the Treasure Hunting Class will once again be out in force! We will provide weekly updates of our finds, so stay tuned!
 
Last edited:
OP
Kindle Farmers

Kindle Farmers

Jr. Member
Sep 25, 2014
60
246
Vermont
🥇 Banner finds
1
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #142
We started a display case to exhibit some of out finds. Hopefully we will be able to fill a few this year!

IMG_0251.JPG
 

DaytonaRacer

Sr. Member
May 21, 2013
486
220
NJ
Detector(s) used
BH Tracker IV,
Fisher F22,
Garrett Pro Pointer
Primary Interest:
Other
Update: 3/31/16

A couple weeks ago we received and e-mail from Joe Serbaroli, author of European Bayonets of the American Civil War: A Guide to the Imported Bayonets of the Union and Confederacy, Including American-made Bayonets for Foreign Arms. He was able to provide some fantastic new information on our bayonet. While we received great information from members here and through our own research, Mr. Serbaroli offered some corrections and additions.

Our bayonet was manufactured in the city of Liege, in modern day Belgium between 1760 and 1780. Liege was one of the major arms manufacturing centers servicing many European powers. He was able to date the bayonet as being made after 1750 because is contains a third Mortis (notch on the socket), which was invented in France in the 1750's. Similar examples were excavated at Fort Ligonier. This particular bayonet would have been issued to American colonial troops rather than British regulars during the French and Indian Wars. It would have likely shipped from Amsterdam or Rotterdam and arrived in Portsmouth, NH as part of the business operations of Patriot John Hancock, probably by merchant Bomar Shea(sic). Once in NH, the serial number would have been hand engraved. The D would be the company number, and the N 826 would have been the weapon number.
Since our school is situated on a mid-1700's home site first owned by former New Hampshire settlers with a military background, the bayonet very likely saw use during the French and Indian Wars and possibly the Revolution. This is not to say it was used in battle, but it would have been in the militia inventory and assigned to a militiaman.

We are currently in the process of building a display case to exhibit the bayonet and other finds from our area.

Also, with the start of 4th Quarter, the Treasure Hunting Class will once again be out in force! We will provide weekly updates of our finds, so stay tuned!

Wow! That's some crazy amount of detail he provided! Great to know it likely had some significance for a colonist.

And congrats for the banner thread designation!
 

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