✅ SOLVED Found Today in back yard buried... i think it is a real horseshoe but not sure on era

snapler

Tenderfoot
Jul 17, 2016
9
4
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Found Today in back yard buried... i think it is a real horseshoe but not sure on era
questions i want answered... is it a front shoe? is it a back shoe of a horse? what era 1700's or 1800's or what have you? the closer the better. i am no horseshoe expert or rookie. all i think for sure it is not part of a horseshoe game.
four reference pics... all of the same horseshoe
https://postimg.org/image/kcgvo01vb/
https://postimg.org/image/p94b8ipht
https://postimg.org/image/jm7yb1mz5
https://postimg.org/image/fr4k8h3td

yes there is a back and front shot. if needed i could get width which i think is about an inch or so thick. Weird thing is i don't live anywhere near horses.

Kudos to any person that can shed light to this matter. to answer potential questions to what i plan for it? i am not 100 percent sure... maybe hang it.
 

Hughie

Jr. Member
Jun 25, 2016
58
84
Geneva Lakes area , Wisconsin
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In my opinion it is a more modern shoe. It looks machine made, as good as blacksmiths could be they could not be as exact as a machine. If I remember correctly, the only front or rear shoe would be if it was for a heavy draft horse that would be doing field work, this one has a calk (the long wear piece) but not like the ones that have come up in the family fields, large shoes that make you think of monster mudder tires when they are seen. Best I can do (it's been a long time) and I hope it helps some.
 

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snapler

Tenderfoot
Jul 17, 2016
9
4
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
i appreciated the insight to the matter. As a follow up question Hugh... were all horseshoes made with toe calks? if not when did they start(what year)... i know i am making you relive your past but thus far you have been my sole helper in this matter.
 

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TomPA

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Feb 13, 2011
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Horseshoes can often be difficult to date as particular styles overlapped others. And blacksmiths often had their own style. Maybe this info will help. 0717162145.jpg
 

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Back-of-the-boat

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Apr 18, 2013
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If you hang it hang it with the open end up so the luck doesn't run out.
 

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BosnMate

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Sep 10, 2010
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It's a corrective shoe for a hind foot. The horse was probably severely cow hocked, and who ever shod the horse was trying to get that foot to break over the center of the toe. That's not a heel cork on the shoe, that's intended to elevate the foot a bit, or perhaps the foot is worn down on that part of the heel, and the farrier was trying to level the foot. The trailer can only be on a hind foot, because if it was on a front foot odds are the horse would step on it, then a couple of things can happen, you can have a hell of a wreck, or the shoe just might be pulled, breaking up the front foot in the process. Even without the trailer the shoe is the shape of a hind foot. Front feet are rounder. The trailer kinda sorta is like a boat rudder, again, when that foot hits the ground, the farrier is attempting to get the toe to be turned straight, so the again, on the next step the foot will break over the center. The shoe does have a toe grab on it, and that is in fact for traction. That also might be why the other stuff, because the toe grab will make it harder for the foot to break over the toe. How old is the shoe? I don't know. It's pretty rusty, does that help. It looks to me like a machine made shoe, and I built shoes just like that in 1959, That's 57 years ago, and people were building corrective shoes like that long before I came around. I would say it does not date back to revolutionary war, and probably not the civil war. More than likely after 1900, and even more probable within the last 50 years. A horse shoe is a horse shoe is a horse shoe. Horses have been shod for hundreds of years, and the shape of the foot hasn't changed, so it's kind of hard to put any sort of an age date on a rusty shoe.
 

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snapler

Tenderfoot
Jul 17, 2016
9
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Primary Interest:
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Thanks to all that aided me in this matter. Special shout out of thanks to Bos for getting back to me. I would thumbs up or like but not sure how seeing how i am new. Thanks again.
 

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Hughie

Jr. Member
Jun 25, 2016
58
84
Geneva Lakes area , Wisconsin
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It's a corrective shoe for a hind foot. The horse was probably severely cow hocked, and who ever shod the horse was trying to get that foot to break over the center of the toe. That's not a heel cork on the shoe, that's intended to elevate the foot a bit, or perhaps the foot is worn down on that part of the heel, and the farrier was trying to level the foot. The trailer can only be on a hind foot, because if it was on a front foot odds are the horse would step on it, then a couple of things can happen, you can have a hell of a wreck, or the shoe just might be pulled, breaking up the front foot in the process. Even without the trailer the shoe is the shape of a hind foot. Front feet are rounder. The trailer kinda sorta is like a boat rudder, again, when that foot hits the ground, the farrier is attempting to get the toe to be turned straight, so the again, on the next step the foot will break over the center. The shoe does have a toe grab on it, and that is in fact for traction. That also might be why the other stuff, because the toe grab will make it harder for the foot to break over the toe. How old is the shoe? I don't know. It's pretty rusty, does that help. It looks to me like a machine made shoe, and I built shoes just like that in 1959, That's 57 years ago, and people were building corrective shoes like that long before I came around. I would say it does not date back to revolutionary war, and probably not the civil war. More than likely after 1900, and even more probable within the last 50 years. A horse shoe is a horse shoe is a horse shoe. Horses have been shod for hundreds of years, and the shape of the foot hasn't changed, so it's kind of hard to put any sort of an age date on a rusty shoe.

Great! Pop shoed horses along time ago and I was trying to remember what little I picked up from him. So glad you were able to fill in the many gaps. (Truthfully I've cleaned a bunch of hooves and never noticed the front was different from the rear, guess my only concern with the back feet was getting them up, cleaned, and placed back down without getting booted).
 

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