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gutheory

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May 29, 2012
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Germany
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Hi all.

I hope you will be able to help me out here. I have been trying to ID this pistol. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to ID it. There are no markings to be seen anywhere on the pistol.

Thank you in advance..

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Retired Sarge

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Feb 22, 2009
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Interesting, so far I've figured out it is a short barrel, top break single action revolver with a finger rest. Now to narrow down who made it.

Mike
 

NOLA_Ken

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Jan 4, 2011
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Well this ones a bit hard to track down. First thought is an H&R, but the grip profile and barrel seem off for them, second thought was Smith and Wesson, but again, not quite right. Then I noticed your info says Germany, which led me to think it could be an old Russian revolver. I really don't know much about them but maybe that could help your search.

Look very closely at the top and sides of the barrel.... there may be faint markings there.
 

Retired Sarge

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Feb 22, 2009
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I've tried French, Russian, German, Swiss, Spanish, Italian and US so far, a lot of close matches but none exact. Can we get a shot straight down on it, also under the barrel there looks to be a groove, or is this a shadow?

Also breaking it down might show some armory stamps etc, these can lead to a country of orgin and lead to an ID.

Mike
 
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gutheory

Newbie
May 29, 2012
4
0
Germany
Primary Interest:
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Hey there..

Thanks for trying to help.

Somebody said on another forum. That the end of the barrel may have been cut off. Don't know if that helps. It doesn't look like it. Unless somebody took the time to do a proper job...
 
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gutheory

Newbie
May 29, 2012
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Germany
Primary Interest:
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  • Thread Starter
  • Thread starter
  • #6
Well this ones a bit hard to track down. First thought is an H&R, but the grip profile and barrel seem off for them, second thought was Smith and Wesson, but again, not quite right. Then I noticed your info says Germany, which led me to think it could be an old Russian revolver. I really don't know much about them but maybe that could help your search.

Look very closely at the top and sides of the barrel.... there may be faint markings there.

No external markings anywhere. Could be because of corrosion. Will take a closer look under some light this week.

My friend picked up a job lot. Old flintlock muskets, and pistols. And a working German Mauser Bolt Action Rifle. "EPSPINGARDA PORTUGEZA 65 MOD 1904 DEUTSCHE WAFFEN -UND MUNITIONFABRIKEN BERLIN." It's a great old rifle. Will double check where he got this pistol though. DDR maybe..

Apart from the dirt and rust it's in working order. Still very smooth. Wouldn't test it for love nor money..:)
 
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Retired Sarge

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Feb 22, 2009
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Got an ID finally, Smith & Wesson Model 3, there were some made for the Russians. Finger rest is broken, barrel has been trimmed.

The Smith & Wesson Model 3 was a single action, cartridge-firing, top-break revolver produced by Smith & Wesson from 1870 to 1915, and again recently as a reproduction by Smith & Wesson themselves, Armi San Marco, and Uberti.

It was produced in several variations and sub-variations, including both the aforementioned "Russian Model", so named because it was supplied to military of Tsarist Russia (20,000 No. 3's were ordered in .44 caliber by the Russian Army in 1871),and the "Schofield" model, named after Major George W. Schofield,who made his own modifications to the Model 3 to meet his perceptions of the Cavalry's needs, which Smith & Wesson incorporated into an 1875 design they named after the Major, planning to obtain significant military contracts for the new revolver.

The S&W Model 3 was originally chambered for the .44 S&W Americanand .44 Russian cartridges, and typically did not have the cartridge information stamped on the gun (as is standard practice for most commercial firearms). Model 3 revolvers were also later produced in an assortment of calibres, including .44 Henry Rimfire, .44-40, .32-44, .38-44, and .45 Schofield.

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Mie
 
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NOLA_Ken

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Great ID! I looked at the S&Ws and was thrown off by the barrel.... Didn't cross my mind it could have been cut down.

As to it being a shooter..... I may be just a bit crazy, but if I had that pistol, I'd give it a good cleaning and oiling to remove the rust, and check it for any damage to the frame cylinder and barrel, and if I didn't find any I'd try to track down some ammo for it. I think I'd be content with light loads, but if there were no defects I'd pretty much have to shoot it at least one time. Several years ago a friend of mine came over with an Arisaka rifle his uncle brought home from the war. I cleaned it up (had been in a closet since 1946) and rummaged through my random ammo box and found 6 rounds of post war 6.5.... an hour later I fired it for the first time since the day it was dropped on Okinawa. Something about actually shooting the old guns just makes their history seem more alive to me than it does seeing them on the wall.
 

Retired Sarge

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Feb 22, 2009
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Great ID! I looked at the S&Ws and was thrown off by the barrel.... Didn't cross my mind it could have been cut down.

As to it being a shooter..... I may be just a bit crazy, but if I had that pistol, I'd give it a good cleaning and oiling to remove the rust, and check it for any damage to the frame cylinder and barrel, and if I didn't find any I'd try to track down some ammo for it. I think I'd be content with light loads, but if there were no defects I'd pretty much have to shoot it at least one time. Several years ago a friend of mine came over with an Arisaka rifle his uncle brought home from the war. I cleaned it up (had been in a closet since 1946) and rummaged through my random ammo box and found 6 rounds of post war 6.5.... an hour later I fired it for the first time since the day it was dropped on Okinawa. Something about actually shooting the old guns just makes their history seem more alive to me than it does seeing them on the wall.

Couldn't agree with you more, when one does that history does come alive, very well put Ken!

Mike
 

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