King Philips War

KarenD

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King Philip's War

Has anyone found artifacts that could probably be from King Philip's War?
 
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vpnavy

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Until someone pipes in - I searched the Forum and listed a few of the many hits (that may or may not meet your request)...


 

Charl

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One of the links above states that King Philp's War was the first colonial war. It was not. The first was the Pequot War (1637). During that conflict, the natives learned that the English practiced what the natives did not, namely, total war, i.e., slaughtering old men, women, and children. But King Philip's War was by far the bloodiest conflict of that era in New England. I can't recommend the book at the link highly enough, as it helps the reader locate sites associated with the war, not to dig, but to visit:

King Philip's War: The History and Legacy of America's Forgotten Conflict: Eric B. Schultz, Michael J. Tougias: 9780881504835: Amazon.com: Books

Living in RI, site of the war's largest engagement, the Great Swamp Massacre of December, 1675, I have visited locations associated with the war, a stone built hilltop fortification built by the Narragansett, etc. I don't metal detect, and if I thought I had found an actual battle site, for instance, I personally would not disturb a site of that historical importance by actually digging. I am a surface hunter. The closest I've come is finding 2 brass or copper triangles near a village site of the Narragansett that dates to the era of the war, and no later then that era. The lopsided triangle was hafted by simply angling the notch in the shaft so the tip would point straight. These 2 modest pieces are among my most treasured finds since they date to the era of conflict between the English and the local natives. The broken was found within a half mile of a known skirmish. The natives returned to the site to bury their dead later.
 

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oxbowbarefoot

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Possibly, I have found plenty of artifacts that date from the time of King Philips War here in Western Massachusetts.
 

unclemac

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"king Phillip's war"...
isn't that where the descendants of the pilgrims wiped out the descendants of the Indian tribe that kept their ancestors alive?
 

Charl

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"king Phillip's war"...
isn't that where the descendants of the pilgrims wiped out the descendants of the Indian tribe that kept their ancestors alive?

Metacom, the son of Massasoit, led the rebellion. The tribe was the Wamponaug. Metacom was called King Philip by the English after Philip of Macedonia of Ancient Greece. Philip would eventually be killed when his cause was lost and he returned to his homeland on the Mt. Hope peninsula in Bristol, RI. Killed by another Wamponaug, his head impaled on a stake displayed in Plymouth for decades after. The tribes were not truly wiped out. The Eastern Niantics of southern RI had remained neutral and took in Narragansett refuges. These are the Narragansett of today. Small groups of Wamponaug enclaves exist on Martha's Vineyard and elsewhere in Ma. The Pequots and Mohegans fought on the side of the English. Those 2 tribes and the Narragansett have reservations today.

King Philip's War - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The largest engagement of the war, another example of total war on the part of the English.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Great_Swamp_Fight
 
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KarenD

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Personally, I never knew about King Philip's War until a week ago; it was not taught in school. Did your school teach about it?
What I find particularly interesting is the lack of a balanced account from both sides. To be sure, both sides got slaughtered, but while the colonists were creating written record, the natives were not. Consequently, it could very well be that the battoegrounds, themselves, are the best primary sources we have.
Thanks for the photo and stories.
 

Charl

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Personally, I never knew about King Philip's War until a week ago; it was not taught in school. Did your school teach about it?
What I find particularly interesting is the lack of a balanced account from both sides. To be sure, both sides got slaughtered, but while the colonists were creating written record, the natives were not. Consequently, it could very well be that the battoegrounds, themselves, are the best primary sources we have.
Thanks for the photo and stories.


In very recent years, a very important battle site was rediscovered. Where Philip was trapped a few days after the war began, but where he and his band managed to escape into Nipmuck Country in central Ma. The war would have ended right there but for an English tactical blunder that allowed Philip to escape. Near the end of the war, another engagement there where the English captured many Narragansett women and children. The place is known as Nipsachuc. Apparently, it has been a place of ceremony for the Narragansett for centuries. The federal government has placed the site in protective status I believe. We can be certain that the Narragansett have never forgotten the exact location of the Great Swamp Fight either. It is possible state archaeologists have located it as well, but the Narragansetts would never talk openly about their knowledge. The present location of the monument to the battle is not the actual battle location.

Here is a decent 10 minute summery of King Philip's War:

 
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Charl

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Actually, I just found a FAR better 5 minute summary of the war. There is a Part 1, but this is the more relevant segment:

 

GMD52

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Charl,

I really enjoyed your presentation on King Phillip's war. I have a ancestor, John Coddington who faught in King Phillips war, and later was constable in Barnstable. He originally moved to R.I. with Roger Williams, nd lived with the Narragannsett Indians for a while. I thank you for the trip through time, it got me to open up the family history again. HH:hello2:
 

Charl

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Thanks. That's really cool, related to one of the founding families in RI. Especially knowing he lived with the Narragansett as well, and fought in that war. That's some exciting family history to explore, happy to have inspired you!
 

scepter1

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GMD52 - I have an ancestor that probably was with your Coddington. He's Samuel Wilbore and he was kicked out of Plymouth Colony for expressing his religiouis belief with roger Williams. He and 17 others purchased what later became Rhode Island ! Yes. all of Rhode Island...
Portsmouth Compact - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Samuel Wilbore "He, with seventeen others, fled to Providence; and, being advised by Roger Williams, they purchased of the Indians the Island of Aquidnic (now Rhode Island), to which place he removed his family early in 1638. These eighteen persons formed a colony by solemn compact, March 7, 1638 (History of Rhode Island)."

I also have Van Ettens, which came to America in 1636, etc.
 

Charl

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GMD52 - I have an ancestor that probably was with your Coddington. He's Samuel Wilbore and he was kicked out of Plymouth Colony for expressing his religiouis belief with roger Williams. He and 17 others purchased what later became Rhode Island ! Yes. all of Rhode Island...
Portsmouth Compact - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Samuel Wilbore "He, with seventeen others, fled to Providence; and, being advised by Roger Williams, they purchased of the Indians the Island of Aquidnic (now Rhode Island), to which place he removed his family early in 1638. These eighteen persons formed a colony by solemn compact, March 7, 1638 (History of Rhode Island)."

I also have Van Ettens, which came to America in 1636, etc.

Cool. The way it worked, William's Providence Plantations settlement joined with the settlers of Aquidneck Island in Narragansett Bay, which was also called Rhode Island, to form the colony of "Rhode Island and Providence Plantations".
And that's the state's official name today, so the smallest state has the longest name of any state. You guys are lucky to have such family histories tied to the colonization of New England. My ancestors didn't arrive from Ireland until 1852.
 

delislejr

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I actually located the location of the battle after years of looking. I confirmed it as the location as it is surrounded by State of Rhode Island "No Trespassing signs". It is very difficult to get to and is only accessible by kayak or canoe. Although I would never venture onto the site itself and violate the law, I am sure there are many artifacts from the battle just waiting to be discovered in the mud surrounding the actual fort site itself on public land.
 
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Charl

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I actually located the location of the battle after years of looking. I confirmed it as the location as it is surrounded by State of Rhode Island "No Trespassing signs". It is very difficult to get to.

I know you. I bought the bowl off you that Jeff now owns. I remember where you said it was. You can bet your bottom dollar that the Narragansett know exactly where as well.
 

delislejr

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They do. There was a red stripe painted on a tree where it looks like they land by canoe to get access to the fort site itself. I miss that bowl!
 

arrow86

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Thanks for all the info .... I hadn't ever learned anything about this until reading and watching the videos .It's unbelievable how many small wars and attacks their were
 

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