Rebecca Taggart, Phantom of the Caballos

HarryLime

Greenie
Oct 29, 2015
15
30
Levelland, Texas
Primary Interest:
Cache Hunting
Rebecca Taggart's book about her search in the Caballos is a great read. Copies are hard to find--I read it in a university library and I'd love to own a copy someday. She contracted with Doc Noss for him to look after some of her mining claims. She also witnessed Willie Douthit being led around by a sheriff's posse.

Rebecca was a very beautiful woman, as you can see from the photo on the backcover. Rebecca writes that she was an ugly duckling when she was a child. Her high-society, French mother looked down on her, preferring Rebecca's older, beautiful sisters. Then tragedy struck the family and her sisters all fell ill and died. Afterwards, Rebecca came into her own and grew to be a stunning beauty.

The love story about Rebecca and her husband Charles was also fascinating. Charles Taggart was about 35, the son of a wealthy family around San Francisco. He'd come into possession of an old map, written, I think, in Castilian and Latin. He needed a translator, but who could he trust? Charles Taggart chose the 16 year-old niece of Porfirio Díaz, president of Mexico. It was a good move. Who else but a 16 year-old girl would chose love over gold?

Rebecca helped translate the map and visited Taggart's camp in the Caballos. There Taggart made another very good move. There was an old Apache who knew secrets about a mine his tribe had sealed up with warriors chained inside. Taggart knew very well the Apache would never share any informaton with him. So he hired the old warrior to be Rebecca's bodyguard. As Taggart hoped, the old, battle-hardened Apache and the young, good-hearted girl became close friends. He shared his secret with Rebecca, giving directions to the mine as best he could remember.

Charles and Rebecca fell in love. They were married with the approval of Rebecca's father. The couple spent years searching the Caballos. The book tells how on Rebecca's first night in camp, they witnessed strange lights suddenly appear hovering over the ground. Another times, decades later, she tells how balls of light, apparently electric, drifted through their tunnels.

I would have loved to have known Rebecca Taggart. As I read everything I can find about the Caballos and Victorio Peak, I've come to feel a lot of affection for some of the people involved. Their lives are just as fascinating to me as any lost treasure. Rebecca was a resolute woman who made a promise to her husband on his deathbed to keep searching. She never backed down. Once, because she was the smallest, she had to crawl into a tunnel that dynamite had collapsed and pull out a trapped man. Another time the mule she was riding fell from a high trail--Rebecca grabbed onto a tree branch and when the mule hit bottom, the dynamite in the packs exploded, splattering mule all over the rocks. Her life became very hard, but she never gave up, never broke her promise.

Stories are told about the Taggarts that don't appear in Rebecca's book. Some say she claimed she and her husband discovered a burial cave with 100s of skeletons inside, but covered it back up because it was sacred. A sense of mystery surrounds both the book and the Caballos/Victorio Peak. A sense that the real story remains untold. But the saddest thing, to me, is that the life stories of searchers like Rebecca Taggart are mostly unknown or forgotten. It doesn't matter if she never found what she was looking for. Her story's inspiring and admirable. People like her should never be forgotten.

Rebecca Taggart.JPG
 

Thanks for the coffee! I tried your link, but it's telling me there's an error and won't bring anything up.
 

I had a copy once but i cant find it, been looking for a copy myself.
 

6eb171ae-252c-41f3-9fc7-9e195c33ba5b.jpgf2b06184-e211-47cd-8685-16ffb73964a3.jpg

You can Thank Garry for these, hopefully he will be back soon with some more interesting stuff
on Willie, margaret, Doc and the gang.
 

Not real good at putting pictures abd stuff on here but i will get it figured out
 

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The Taggarts were some of the first treasure hunters in the Caballo's with any history written about them, and there's not much.
Charles Taggart had a map, I wonder where he got it, I believe he had a relative that was an outlaw in New Mexico before he got
there, maybe this relative pillaged the map and passed it on.
Or maybe he knew president Diaz before he came to New Mexico and aquired it from him, mr. Diaz was a big time treasurehunter himself.
NP has stated that there used to be statue's in some of the caves in the Caballo's, some say there used to be statues out in the open
sculpted right out of the natural rock on the east side of the Caballo's, and the Taggart's removed them and sent them to Diaz.
It is known that Diaz had certain treasure sign's rock carvings and such removed down in mexico and brought to him, some of these were
large and took alot of labor.
 

Ive also heard that the Taggart's found and worked a really rich placer in the caballo's that still
bears their name, one day one of their peons working these placer's found a solid gold perfectly
round sphere. I also wonder what truth there is to Franklin Roosevelt investing in their venture's,
he supposdly built a cabin right out side the cave they lived in.
 

:coffee2:Roosevelts Interest was in the placers across from the caballo;s, If you take the exit road off 25 to Hillsboro the placers are on the right hand side of the road at the local water shed area, maybe 7 miles or so from the exit, across the road from the placers and down in a little valley is a windmill next to a wash, In the wash on bed rock is hundreds of Aztecs petroglyphs and writings covered by sand and rock.
you will need permission. also the placers were worked over by many people over the years, good luck. NP:cat:
 

Ive also heard that the Taggart's found and worked a really rich placer in the caballo's that still
bears their name, one day one of their peons working these placer's found a solid gold perfectly
round sphere. I also wonder what truth there is to Franklin Roosevelt investing in their venture's,
he supposdly built a cabin right out side the cave they lived in.

More William White nonsense - the lone source of the FDR rumor.
 

I think you're onto something with the Diaz connection. I'd considered the fact Rebecca Taggart was Diaz's niece just to be a coincidence, but now that you mention Diaz was a treasure hunter, it makes a lot more sense why Charles Taggart would approach Rebecca in the first place. I should've remembered there's no such thing as coincidence.

I've read that Roosevelt invested in one of the Oak Island operations. Seems plausible he'd be interested in southwest treasure legends as well.

Any idea what Taggart's outlaw relative might've been named? Or what size the gold spheres were supposed to have been (tiny? huge?)? I got the sense from Rebecca's book that maybe she knew a lot more than what she was saying. I think someone even suggested Charles Taggart's accident wih the rock hitting his head might have been foul play--considering Willie Douthit and the "guerilla gang" and who knows who else were all active in those days, I guess it's possible.

NP, I'd love to see those Aztec petroglyphs someday. Also, I've read another poster mention Phoenician Tanits found in certain canyons. If asked politely, are landowners generally okay with respectful visits to those areas--or is that a question that tends to upset people?
 

I remembered a little more on this subject, although not story I originally heard, in Cummins (silver prospectors) book ''Lure of the Caballo's'' he took Mrs Taggart up to her claims when she
was in her eighty's, she stated that her workers had romoved several large sphere's of gold from one of her mines without telling her.

one tale of El Presidente Diaz romoving rock carvings is in Henry James book ''Curse of the San Andres'' one of the fist written on this subject
and although it reads somewhat like a gradeschool Kids book, one thing I always think about is he started research for this book lass than
ayear after Doc died and went down in the peak when there was still gold there.
 

I think you're onto something with the Diaz connection. I'd considered the fact Rebecca Taggart was Diaz's niece just to be a coincidence, but now that you mention Diaz was a treasure hunter, it makes a lot more sense why Charles Taggart would approach Rebecca in the first place. I should've remembered there's no such thing as coincidence.

I've read that Roosevelt invested in one of the Oak Island operations. Seems plausible he'd be interested in southwest treasure legends as well.

Any idea what Taggart's outlaw relative might've been named? Or what size the gold spheres were supposed to have been (tiny? huge?)? I got the sense from Rebecca's book that maybe she knew a lot more than what she was saying. I think someone even suggested Charles Taggart's accident wih the rock hitting his head might have been foul play--considering Willie Douthit and the "guerilla gang" and who knows who else were all active in those days, I guess it's possible.

NP, I'd love to see those Aztec petroglyphs someday. Also, I've read another poster mention Phoenician Tanits found in certain canyons. If asked politely, are landowners generally okay with respectful visits to those areas--or is that a question that tends to upset people?
:coffee2: I would think that the U of NM would have photo's of the site. NP:cat:
 

I think you're onto something with the Diaz connection. I'd considered the fact Rebecca Taggart was Diaz's niece just to be a coincidence, but now that you mention Diaz was a treasure hunter, it makes a lot more sense why Charles Taggart would approach Rebecca in the first place. I should've remembered there's no such thing as coincidence.

I've read that Roosevelt invested in one of the Oak Island operations. Seems plausible he'd be interested in southwest treasure legends as well.

Any idea what Taggart's outlaw relative might've been named? Or what size the gold spheres were supposed to have been (tiny? huge?)? I got the sense from Rebecca's book that maybe she knew a lot more than what she was saying. I think someone even suggested Charles Taggart's accident wih the rock hitting his head might have been foul play--considering Willie Douthit and the "guerilla gang" and who knows who else were all active in those days, I guess it's possible.

NP, I'd love to see those Aztec petroglyphs someday. Also, I've read another poster mention Phoenician Tanits found in certain canyons. If asked politely, are landowners generally okay with respectful visits to those areas--or is that a question that tends to upset people?

FDR actually was involved at Oak Island, in what capacity is not clear, but below is a photo of him in 1909 on site with his partners. He was stricken with polio in 1921 - already a well-known figure (state senator, governor, secretary of the navy, etc.). According to White, FDR spent six months in the Caballos in a cabin he built himself on/near the Taggert claims. Don't you think it's unusual that a man of this renown, who was crippled and needed constant medical care, might pull this off without some notice from the public or a mention from his family or the East Coast establishment? I don't think it's unusual at all - it's a lie. Of course, if you can provide documentation other than from White, I'll eat my words.

We'd all love to see those Aztec petroglyphs, or at least photos. Unfortunately, I suspect these are pipe dreams too.

The Phoenician petroglyphs do exist in fact. The "certain canyons" where they can be found are in the Lower Rio Grande Valley, in the hills on both sides of the river from Las Cruces north up to the Uvas region, and as far west from Las Cruces in the Robledos, Goodsights, Cooks Range, etc. I haven't seen evidence that they have been found in the Caballos, but I wouldn't rule it out. I posted a number of photos of these ancient carvings (Tanits, etc.) in an earlier post: http://www.treasurenet.com/forums/victorio-peak/111197-victorio-peak-update-2.html#post4223720 You'll be hard-pressed finding the locations of many of these carvings because those who know where they are want to protect them from vandalism.


fdr.jpg
FDR on Oak Island
 

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Thanks for the link to those great photos, sdcfia! And I agree, protecting the carvings should be number one priority. I'd like to see the jackasses who vandalized the Los Lunas Decalogue stone hanged.

The 3rd Gold House book says that the 1990s-era Noss operation on Victorio Peak uncovered some Ogham writing within the peak. I've been studying pre-Columbian voyagers to North America ever since I was a kid. My parents and grandparents all used to listen to Dr. Gene Scott when he spoke on subjects like the Phoenicians, the Ten Lost Tribes, and Knights Templar. Later on, I read Barry Fell's America BC. I also got interested in the role Freemasonry plays in all this, as well as the KGC.

I'm still learning and the process has been fun and mind bending. It's a shame most people my age don't even care to know the standard version of history, let alone what you might call the secret history below the surface.

Other posters have mentioned the theory that the biblical Ophir is located in North America, that Victorio Peak and the Caballos are depositories for gold from King Solomon's mines. It might sound fantastic, but the theory strikes a chord with me.
 

:coffee2:For your Info, The placer claims are very well known in the area and so are the petroglyphs, several of the locals have many photo's of both. and since the U of NM excavated the spot why would they not have photo's. And for photo's taken around VP, when permission was given to ONFP to excavate they were restricted to the main area, and the MP's made sure they conformed to these rules and regulations.and the only people allowed in the area had to have a ONFP IDcard and a base security card,and they were carefully monitored. no one was allowed to stray from the area or explore. all photo's of other things in the area were taken years before VP became popular. that's not a pipe dream , that's a fact . NP:cat:.
 

NP would this be the placers known as the Shannon, or Shandon placers, this is where Mrs Taggart told Mr Cummins they worked
Mr Taggart had hired an old Apache as a bodyguard for rebbecca hoping that they would chum up and he would disclose some of
his Apache secrets, and it seemed to have paid off he remembered going to the placers as a child and lead them there.

I dont Know if this was before or after the deppression hit Charles so hard, but when he died in 1935 he left Rebbecca $35,000.00
not to bad for hard times.

When Mrs Taggart and Mr Cummins went into the old diggings, there were lots of box's of dirt al over the place she explained
that they grew mushrooms to make ends meet.
 

Supposedly when they broke through to the skeleton cave Charles was in the hospital and never Knew anything
about it, the workers said that was what they were looking for but she said the skeletons were laid end to end
and some were wraped so it had to be a sacred burial ground, so she ordered it covered up.
 

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