I found this Coffee pot

flyadive

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I found what I think is a coffee percolator in an old one room school house in Pa. It holds 4 cups water although it says 6? Anyone ever seen one of these and I think it’s missing something?
 
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flyadive

flyadive

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Or possibly tea. It seems to me that it needs another pot to simmer in? Idk.
 
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AU Seeker

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I don't think it's a coffee percolator because there's no spout and all the ones I saw growing up didn't have that many "levels", if it is a percolator it would be at least missing the "basket", all the ones from when I was growing up had a basket on a tube, you put the coffee grounds in the basket and when the water started boiling the water would go up the tube and out into the basket draining through the coffee grounds, the "percolating" noise was when the water came out the tube in spurts making the noise which could be seen in the glass portion of the lid.

What it look more like to me is a small "double boiler", you put water in the lower section and stuff like chocolate or cheese in the upper section to heat/melt it without burning it, it's also used for making delicate sauces which burn easily, albeit all double boilers I have seen have handles for each section which this doesn't have.
 
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Seems like there should be a STRAINER cap that goes over the Coffee holder
 

pepperj

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I don't think it's a coffee percolator because there's no spout and all the ones I saw growing up didn't have that many "levels", if it is a percolator it would be at least missing the "basket", all the ones from when I was growing up had a basket on a tube, you put the coffee grounds in the basket and when the water started boiling the water would go up the tube and out into the basket draining through the coffee grounds, the "percolating" noise was when the water came out the tube in spurts making the noise which could be seen in the glass portion of the lid.

What it look more like to me is a small "double boiler", you put water in the lower section and stuff like chocolate or cheese in the upper section to heat/melt it without burning it, it's also used for making delicate sauces which burn easily, albeit all double boilers I have seen have handles for each section which this doesn't have.
The second photo shows there's holes in the bottom of the large unit as well.
It's an insert for another unit for sure.
 

DigToChina

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I don't think it's a coffee percolator because there's no spout and all the ones I saw growing up didn't have that many "levels", if it is a percolator it would be at least missing the "basket", all the ones from when I was growing up had a basket on a tube, you put the coffee grounds in the basket and when the water started boiling the water would go up the tube and out into the basket draining through the coffee grounds, the "percolating" noise was when the water came out the tube in spurts making the noise which could be seen in the glass portion of the lid.

What it look more like to me is a small "double boiler", you put water in the lower section and stuff like chocolate or cheese in the upper section to heat/melt it without burning it, it's also used for making delicate sauces which burn easily, albeit all double boilers I have seen have handles for each section which this doesn't have.
Think AU is right. I’d think the part with holes is the steamer component.
 

nagant

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Missing a handle. Must work like the stovetop expresso makers somehow? Any brand name?
 

Red-Coat

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What you have there are the ‘Drip-o-Lator” parts from a vintage “WearEver” stovetop coffee set. I believe it’s model #968, sold as a seven-piece set until the 1950s, comprising Percolator/Drip-O-Lator/Coffee Pot. The lid fitted the Drip-O-Lator as well as the pot, but only the pot itself had a handle and drip-spout.

I think you’ll find the lid is an exact match:

WearEver1.jpg WearEver2.jpg

“WearEver” cookware was launched in 1903 as a vehicle to promote the use of aluminium in new markets by the Aluminum Company of America (ALCOA). [Note English spelling of aluminium and that there is no such substance as “aloominum” outside America :laughing7:]. Initially sold door-to-door by college students and then as direct-to-customer-delivery. The use of a Phillips head screw to secure the finial on the lid puts it no earlier than the second half of the 1930s.
 

AU Seeker

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What you have there are the ‘Drip-o-Lator” parts from a vintage “WearEver” stovetop coffee set. I believe it’s model #968, sold as a seven-piece set until the 1950s, comprising Percolator/Drip-O-Lator/Coffee Pot. The lid fitted the Drip-O-Lator as well as the pot, but only the pot itself had a handle and drip-spout.

I think you’ll find the lid is an exact match:

View attachment 2035209 View attachment 2035210

“WearEver” cookware was launched in 1903 as a vehicle to promote the use of aluminium in new markets by the Aluminum Company of America (ALCOA). [Note English spelling of aluminium and that there is no such substance as “aloominum” outside America :laughing7:]. Initially sold door-to-door by college students and then as direct-to-customer-delivery. The use of a Phillips head screw to secure the finial on the lid puts it no earlier than the second half of the 1930s.
Red-Coat nailed it, here's a photo showing the "basket/strainer/tube" part that I mentioned in my previous reply.

il_680x540.2185582435_qqlf.jpg
 

schreib69

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What you have there are the ‘Drip-o-Lator” parts from a vintage “WearEver” stovetop coffee set. I believe it’s model #968, sold as a seven-piece set until the 1950s, comprising Percolator/Drip-O-Lator/Coffee Pot. The lid fitted the Drip-O-Lator as well as the pot, but only the pot itself had a handle and drip-spout.

I think you’ll find the lid is an exact match:

View attachment 2035209 View attachment 2035210

“WearEver” cookware was launched in 1903 as a vehicle to promote the use of aluminium in new markets by the Aluminum Company of America (ALCOA). [Note English spelling of aluminium and that there is no such substance as “aloominum” outside America :laughing7:]. Initially sold door-to-door by college students and then as direct-to-customer-delivery. The use of a Phillips head screw to secure the finial on the lid puts it no earlier than the second half of the 1930s.
just one thing remains: The conundrum over why it measures out as only 4 cups but "says" 6.
Answer: At some point in time the coffee companies decided to change the definition of a "cup" if used for coffee(or tea?). If you do the measurments on present day coffee makers you will find the same thing-- their measurements equate to only 2/3 of the REAL volume measuring unit known as a "cup"-- 8.11 US oz!
 

Red-Coat

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just one thing remains: The conundrum over why it measures out as only 4 cups but "says" 6.
Answer: At some point in time the coffee companies decided to change the definition of a "cup" if used for coffee(or tea?). If you do the measurments on present day coffee makers you will find the same thing-- their measurements equate to only 2/3 of the REAL volume measuring unit known as a "cup"-- 8.11 US oz!

I always thought it was because it requires more than a cup of water to produce a cup of coffee using the drip method and the markings allow measurement of one or the other. Wiki explains it thus:

A "cup" of coffee in the US is usually 4 fluid ounces (118 ml), brewed using 5 fluid ounces (148 ml) of water. Coffee carafes used with drip coffee makers, e.g. Black and Decker models, have markings for both water and brewed coffee as the carafe is also used for measuring water prior to brewing. A 12-cup carafe, for example, has markings for 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 cups of water or coffee, which correspond to 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 US fluid ounces (0.59, 0.89, 1.18, 1.48, and 1.77 litres) of water or 16, 24, 32, 40, and 48 US fluid ounces (0.47, 0.71, 0.95, 1.18, and 1.42 litres) of brewed coffee respectively, the difference being the volume absorbed by the coffee grounds and lost to evaporation during brewing.
 

boogeyman

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I always thought it was because it requires more than a cup of water to produce a cup of coffee using the drip method and the markings allow measurement of one or the other. Wiki explains it thus:

A "cup" of coffee in the US is usually 4 fluid ounces (118 ml), brewed using 5 fluid ounces (148 ml) of water. Coffee carafes used with drip coffee makers, e.g. Black and Decker models, have markings for both water and brewed coffee as the carafe is also used for measuring water prior to brewing. A 12-cup carafe, for example, has markings for 4, 6, 8, 10, and 12 cups of water or coffee, which correspond to 20, 30, 40, 50, and 60 US fluid ounces (0.59, 0.89, 1.18, 1.48, and 1.77 litres) of water or 16, 24, 32, 40, and 48 US fluid ounces (0.47, 0.71, 0.95, 1.18, and 1.42 litres) of brewed coffee respectively, the difference being the volume absorbed by the coffee grounds and lost to evaporation during brewing.
What the heck?? 4oz isn't a cup of coffee!! Especially for the young ones! Where they gonna put all the cream, fu fu flavors, and sprinkles. Heck 8oz is a sip on my book.
 

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