THE Random Chat Thread - AKA "The RCT" - No shirt or shoes required - Open 24 / 7

Oregon Viking

Gold Member
Jan 6, 2014
10,672
28,715
Brookings-Harbor Oregon
Detector(s) used
White's prizm IV
Keene A52 with Gold Hog mats
Gold-N-Sand hand dredge
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Is this all part of the dowry?
I guess the days of a good goat, pig, 5 chickens, and cow are well behind us all now.
It is coolness shared with my family attending from Ireland. I am currently going through the process of dual citizenship as my grandparents immigrated from Ireland.
Under the Irish Nationality and Citizenship Act of 1956, people born outside Ireland can claim citizenship, if their parents were born in Ireland, but ALSO if a grandparent was born there. So if you’re an American (or any nationality really) with an Irish grandparent, you have the right to claim Irish citizenship under this law.

Dowry:laughing7: I will show that post to my MMA fightin' pistol packin' daughter.... :wav:
 

releventchair

Gold Member
May 9, 2012
18,593
46,945
Primary Interest:
Other
Thank you hope you're day has been good thus far
Took advantage of the heat.
Black folding truck bed cover too hot to touch for more than a quick ouch for a finish / soak area..

Cleaning (well , brushing) and greasing old military leather. The heat really helps.
One leather sling and pouch for oiler from a country that no longer exists by name. Even more "experienced" (read old) than I am probably!
Another newer (?) sling and some minor stuff.

Ran out of ambition for more work but picked up a cosmoline coated item today that would soften up the coating if heated in a similar manner before cleaning.
 

crashbandicoot

Gold Member
Sep 27, 2020
12,127
27,040
Dumas,AR
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Thanks for the update. I do hope he comes back here, though. Even though we didn’t interact much on Tnet, I did enjoy his posts& comments.
He told me he,s not coming back,Treasure_Hunter stated his ban period is over so I guess he meant it,Creaky that is. I think he,s found a home on Gab,seems to like it there.
 
Last edited:

crashbandicoot

Gold Member
Sep 27, 2020
12,127
27,040
Dumas,AR
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
5th class! Say what?
When did I get promoted and by whom?
(Maybe there's only 4 classes)
I don't matter down in these ranks.
If I was on land I would be of only a simple Dalit.
The movie that inspires me still is "Slum Dog Millionaire"

But enough of me.
I'm so relieved that the tap, tap, tap is only from you enjoying the clean air of the deck above.
I lay awake at night in a sweaty fever worried that it was a bad case of stimming that you had, returned.
Oh my misguided thoughts got the best of me once again.
Can you open up a gun port to let some air into the lower deck.
Stimming? You should look that up,probably be surprised!
 

crashbandicoot

Gold Member
Sep 27, 2020
12,127
27,040
Dumas,AR
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Certainly mate. I will open a gun port when we are under way. But not while we are still in port. Otherwise the stench wafting up toward us will suffocate us. Hold fast, we will be underway soon. Navigator crashbandicoot is scratching his head and setting our course now. We are heading west. No wait, looks like heading south. No, north it is.
Somebody unhooked the Gyrocompass again.The chart room is a mess,and the North star has morphed into the Southern Cross.AHHHHHHH! I,m so confused!
 
OP
ARC

ARC

Gold Member
Aug 19, 2014
33,323
109,060
Tarpon Springs
Detector(s) used
JW 8X-ML X2-VP 580
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Exposure suits allow your body to maintain some warmth underwater by slowing down heat loss. Body temperature decreases quickly when submerged in water, and we place ourselves at the risk of losing too much body heat when we dive without the right gear. This is why wearing an exposure suit—either a wetsuit or drysuit—is a must.

Your will cool quickly in response to diving in waters that are cooler than your body’s temperature, and even in the warmest tropical waters you will likely still need a bit of thermal insulation to keep yourself warm and comfortable during long dives. Exposure suits also give your skin protection from the harsh sun, which divers tend not to notice when they’re underwater, despite the fact that it still affects their skin.

One common question asked by both divers and non-divers alike is: What’s the difference between a wetsuit and drysuit, and how can you tell one from the other? The most obvious answer comes from the name itself—a drysuit keeps you dry and a wetsuit does not.

In this article, we take a closer look at the main differences between the two in order to help you decide which suit is best for your needs.

Wetsuit vs. Drysuit​


A wetsuit provides thermal protection for divers and works on the principle that your body is the best source of heat. To help contain this heat underwater, these suits are made with a closed-cell foam material, which is filled with thousands of tiny gas bubbles trapped within the structure. Once you enter the water, the material allows a thin layer of water through the suit, filling the space between your body and the inner layer of material. This layer of water warms up thanks to your body temperature and helps keep you comfortably insulated throughout your dive.

Scuba wetsuits are designed to fit close to the body. A loose fitting wetsuit will let water flow in and out of the gaps between the wetsuit and your skin, which means your body will end up wasting energy to heat the “new” water, making it pointless for thermal insulation.

A wetsuit also has to be thick enough to suit the temperature of the water you’re diving in. Wetsuits vary in thickness—the thicker ones provide more protection and insulation for colder waters, while the thinner ones offer lighter insulation in warmer waters. However, it’s important to remember that everyone’s body is different, which is why a specific suit’s thermal performance will normally vary from person to person. Some scuba divers can dive in tropical waters wearing only a lycra body suit, commonly known as a dive skin, while others will need a 2mm-thick (or more) wetsuit. Some scuba divers can dive in cold water wearing only a 6mm-thick wetsuit, while others need the protection of a drysuit.

What is a Dry suit?​


A drysuit, as the name indicates, keeps you completely dry by ensuring that no water gets into the suit. It can be made out of foam neoprene, crushed neoprene, vulcanized rubber, or heavy-duty nylon. It’s also fully sealed and uses a combination of wrist seals, a neck seal, and a waterproof zipper to keep you dry.

Drysuits fit more loosely than wetsuits and allow you to wear clothes or other insulating layers underneath. They work by keeping an insulating layer of air between the body and the suit, which you can control with inflator valves that allow you to add gas as you go deeper. Drysuits also make use of exhaust valves to release air during ascent.

The inflator valve is similar in function to the power inflator on a buoyancy compensator vest and is often situated in the middle of the chest on the suit.

Maintaining neutral buoyancy in a drysuit requires certain skills. Drysuit diving takes some getting used to and usually requires training and experience. If you’re interested in trying it out, we highly recommend receiving proper training from a qualified instructor.

Comparing Wetsuits and Drysuits​

If you’re trying to decide whether to purchase a wetsuit or drysuit, here are a few key differences that you should consider:

Thermal Insulation​

Wetsuits use a layer of water (that is warmed by the wearer’s body) to help keep the body insulated, while drysuits use a layer of air and are fully sealed to prevent water from entering and coming into contact with the skin. The latter has the advantage here, as water conducts heat over 20 times faster than air.

Divers can wear undergarments with both suits to further increase thermal insulation, but drysuits, thanks to their loose fit, enable you to wear thicker garments underneath.

Mobility​

Due to their skin-tight fit, wetsuits typically make it easier to move quickly and comfortably underwater. Drysuits, depending on the material used, are much baggier and can result in some drag as you move underwater. This means you may end up being much slower than if you had been wearing a wetsuit.

Lifespan​

Drysuits are traditionally more expensive than wetsuits due to their complex construction, which enable them to work in numerous environments. Then again, even the most expensive drysuits can actually be more cost-efficient than high-quality wetsuits as the former can last over 15 years with proper care and maintenance.

Value​

With the emergence of more brands and the availability of newer materials, quality entry-level drysuits now cost as much as higher-end wetsuits. However, drysuits being available at much lower prices certainly doesn’t make them lose their long-term value, as they can often retain their value for resale—unlike wetsuits, which are more likely to deteriorate after a few years of regular use.

Exposure Suit Recommendations​

Temperature*Recommended Suit Thickness*
76°F to 86°F1.6mm Neoprene or Lycra Dive Skin/Wetsuit
69°F to 84°F3mm Neoprene Wetsuit
64°to 77°F5mm Neoprene Wetsuit
49°F to 75°F6.5mm Neoprene Wetsuit
33°F to 66°F9.5mm Neoprene Drysuit
*Temperature and suit thickness based on average manufacturer recommendations
 

crashbandicoot

Gold Member
Sep 27, 2020
12,127
27,040
Dumas,AR
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Apparently not my step dad is very defensive about it my mother has tried to get him to sell it and nope that doesn't happen lol
In this country in winter when all the leaves are off the trees you can spot all kinds of cars,trucks,old jeeps,tractors and such out in tree lines, edges of fields,canal banks and yards. Mustangs,Camaros,GTOs,LeMans,you name it,it,s out there. Ask about buying one and you,ll most likely get cussed out.Don,t know why that is,never had the gumption to ask.
 

crashbandicoot

Gold Member
Sep 27, 2020
12,127
27,040
Dumas,AR
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Exposure suits allow your body to maintain some warmth underwater by slowing down heat loss. Body temperature decreases quickly when submerged in water, and we place ourselves at the risk of losing too much body heat when we dive without the right gear. This is why wearing an exposure suit—either a wetsuit or drysuit—is a must.

Your will cool quickly in response to diving in waters that are cooler than your body’s temperature, and even in the warmest tropical waters you will likely still need a bit of thermal insulation to keep yourself warm and comfortable during long dives. Exposure suits also give your skin protection from the harsh sun, which divers tend not to notice when they’re underwater, despite the fact that it still affects their skin.

One common question asked by both divers and non-divers alike is: What’s the difference between a wetsuit and drysuit, and how can you tell one from the other? The most obvious answer comes from the name itself—a drysuit keeps you dry and a wetsuit does not.

In this article, we take a closer look at the main differences between the two in order to help you decide which suit is best for your needs.

Wetsuit vs. Drysuit​


A wetsuit provides thermal protection for divers and works on the principle that your body is the best source of heat. To help contain this heat underwater, these suits are made with a closed-cell foam material, which is filled with thousands of tiny gas bubbles trapped within the structure. Once you enter the water, the material allows a thin layer of water through the suit, filling the space between your body and the inner layer of material. This layer of water warms up thanks to your body temperature and helps keep you comfortably insulated throughout your dive.

Scuba wetsuits are designed to fit close to the body. A loose fitting wetsuit will let water flow in and out of the gaps between the wetsuit and your skin, which means your body will end up wasting energy to heat the “new” water, making it pointless for thermal insulation.

A wetsuit also has to be thick enough to suit the temperature of the water you’re diving in. Wetsuits vary in thickness—the thicker ones provide more protection and insulation for colder waters, while the thinner ones offer lighter insulation in warmer waters. However, it’s important to remember that everyone’s body is different, which is why a specific suit’s thermal performance will normally vary from person to person. Some scuba divers can dive in tropical waters wearing only a lycra body suit, commonly known as a dive skin, while others will need a 2mm-thick (or more) wetsuit. Some scuba divers can dive in cold water wearing only a 6mm-thick wetsuit, while others need the protection of a drysuit.

What is a Dry suit?​


A drysuit, as the name indicates, keeps you completely dry by ensuring that no water gets into the suit. It can be made out of foam neoprene, crushed neoprene, vulcanized rubber, or heavy-duty nylon. It’s also fully sealed and uses a combination of wrist seals, a neck seal, and a waterproof zipper to keep you dry.

Drysuits fit more loosely than wetsuits and allow you to wear clothes or other insulating layers underneath. They work by keeping an insulating layer of air between the body and the suit, which you can control with inflator valves that allow you to add gas as you go deeper. Drysuits also make use of exhaust valves to release air during ascent.

The inflator valve is similar in function to the power inflator on a buoyancy compensator vest and is often situated in the middle of the chest on the suit.

Maintaining neutral buoyancy in a drysuit requires certain skills. Drysuit diving takes some getting used to and usually requires training and experience. If you’re interested in trying it out, we highly recommend receiving proper training from a qualified instructor.

Comparing Wetsuits and Drysuits​

If you’re trying to decide whether to purchase a wetsuit or drysuit, here are a few key differences that you should consider:

Thermal Insulation​

Wetsuits use a layer of water (that is warmed by the wearer’s body) to help keep the body insulated, while drysuits use a layer of air and are fully sealed to prevent water from entering and coming into contact with the skin. The latter has the advantage here, as water conducts heat over 20 times faster than air.

Divers can wear undergarments with both suits to further increase thermal insulation, but drysuits, thanks to their loose fit, enable you to wear thicker garments underneath.

Mobility​

Due to their skin-tight fit, wetsuits typically make it easier to move quickly and comfortably underwater. Drysuits, depending on the material used, are much baggier and can result in some drag as you move underwater. This means you may end up being much slower than if you had been wearing a wetsuit.

Lifespan​

Drysuits are traditionally more expensive than wetsuits due to their complex construction, which enable them to work in numerous environments. Then again, even the most expensive drysuits can actually be more cost-efficient than high-quality wetsuits as the former can last over 15 years with proper care and maintenance.

Value​

With the emergence of more brands and the availability of newer materials, quality entry-level drysuits now cost as much as higher-end wetsuits. However, drysuits being available at much lower prices certainly doesn’t make them lose their long-term value, as they can often retain their value for resale—unlike wetsuits, which are more likely to deteriorate after a few years of regular use.

Exposure Suit Recommendations​

Temperature*Recommended Suit Thickness*
76°F to 86°F1.6mm Neoprene or Lycra Dive Skin/Wetsuit
69°F to 84°F3mm Neoprene Wetsuit
64°to 77°F5mm Neoprene Wetsuit
49°F to 75°F6.5mm Neoprene Wetsuit
33°F to 66°F9.5mm Neoprene Drysuit
*Temperature and suit thickness based on average manufacturer recommendations
Thanks again,explains it to the nth degree.
 

pepperj

Gold Member
Feb 3, 2009
28,565
95,181
Detector(s) used
Deus, Deus 2, Minelab 3030, E-Trac,
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
Exposure suits allow your body to maintain some warmth underwater by slowing down heat loss. Body temperature decreases quickly when submerged in water, and we place ourselves at the risk of losing too much body heat when we dive without the right gear. This is why wearing an exposure suit—either a wetsuit or drysuit—is a must.

Your will cool quickly in response to diving in waters that are cooler than your body’s temperature, and even in the warmest tropical waters you will likely still need a bit of thermal insulation to keep yourself warm and comfortable during long dives. Exposure suits also give your skin protection from the harsh sun, which divers tend not to notice when they’re underwater, despite the fact that it still affects their skin.

One common question asked by both divers and non-divers alike is: What’s the difference between a wetsuit and drysuit, and how can you tell one from the other? The most obvious answer comes from the name itself—a drysuit keeps you dry and a wetsuit does not.

In this article, we take a closer look at the main differences between the two in order to help you decide which suit is best for your needs.

Wetsuit vs. Drysuit​


A wetsuit provides thermal protection for divers and works on the principle that your body is the best source of heat. To help contain this heat underwater, these suits are made with a closed-cell foam material, which is filled with thousands of tiny gas bubbles trapped within the structure. Once you enter the water, the material allows a thin layer of water through the suit, filling the space between your body and the inner layer of material. This layer of water warms up thanks to your body temperature and helps keep you comfortably insulated throughout your dive.

Scuba wetsuits are designed to fit close to the body. A loose fitting wetsuit will let water flow in and out of the gaps between the wetsuit and your skin, which means your body will end up wasting energy to heat the “new” water, making it pointless for thermal insulation.

A wetsuit also has to be thick enough to suit the temperature of the water you’re diving in. Wetsuits vary in thickness—the thicker ones provide more protection and insulation for colder waters, while the thinner ones offer lighter insulation in warmer waters. However, it’s important to remember that everyone’s body is different, which is why a specific suit’s thermal performance will normally vary from person to person. Some scuba divers can dive in tropical waters wearing only a lycra body suit, commonly known as a dive skin, while others will need a 2mm-thick (or more) wetsuit. Some scuba divers can dive in cold water wearing only a 6mm-thick wetsuit, while others need the protection of a drysuit.

What is a Dry suit?​


A drysuit, as the name indicates, keeps you completely dry by ensuring that no water gets into the suit. It can be made out of foam neoprene, crushed neoprene, vulcanized rubber, or heavy-duty nylon. It’s also fully sealed and uses a combination of wrist seals, a neck seal, and a waterproof zipper to keep you dry.

Drysuits fit more loosely than wetsuits and allow you to wear clothes or other insulating layers underneath. They work by keeping an insulating layer of air between the body and the suit, which you can control with inflator valves that allow you to add gas as you go deeper. Drysuits also make use of exhaust valves to release air during ascent.

The inflator valve is similar in function to the power inflator on a buoyancy compensator vest and is often situated in the middle of the chest on the suit.

Maintaining neutral buoyancy in a drysuit requires certain skills. Drysuit diving takes some getting used to and usually requires training and experience. If you’re interested in trying it out, we highly recommend receiving proper training from a qualified instructor.

Comparing Wetsuits and Drysuits​

If you’re trying to decide whether to purchase a wetsuit or drysuit, here are a few key differences that you should consider:

Thermal Insulation​

Wetsuits use a layer of water (that is warmed by the wearer’s body) to help keep the body insulated, while drysuits use a layer of air and are fully sealed to prevent water from entering and coming into contact with the skin. The latter has the advantage here, as water conducts heat over 20 times faster than air.

Divers can wear undergarments with both suits to further increase thermal insulation, but drysuits, thanks to their loose fit, enable you to wear thicker garments underneath.

Mobility​

Due to their skin-tight fit, wetsuits typically make it easier to move quickly and comfortably underwater. Drysuits, depending on the material used, are much baggier and can result in some drag as you move underwater. This means you may end up being much slower than if you had been wearing a wetsuit.

Lifespan​

Drysuits are traditionally more expensive than wetsuits due to their complex construction, which enable them to work in numerous environments. Then again, even the most expensive drysuits can actually be more cost-efficient than high-quality wetsuits as the former can last over 15 years with proper care and maintenance.

Value​

With the emergence of more brands and the availability of newer materials, quality entry-level drysuits now cost as much as higher-end wetsuits. However, drysuits being available at much lower prices certainly doesn’t make them lose their long-term value, as they can often retain their value for resale—unlike wetsuits, which are more likely to deteriorate after a few years of regular use.

Exposure Suit Recommendations​

Temperature*Recommended Suit Thickness*
76°F to 86°F1.6mm Neoprene or Lycra Dive Skin/Wetsuit
69°F to 84°F3mm Neoprene Wetsuit
64°to 77°F5mm Neoprene Wetsuit
49°F to 75°F6.5mm Neoprene Wetsuit
33°F to 66°F9.5mm Neoprene Drysuit
*Temperature and suit thickness based on average manufacturer recommendations
WD
We're going to be testing you on the above information at 6am sharp.
You're allowed 1-#2 pencil.
5-:coffee2::coffee2::coffee2::coffee2::coffee2:
 

Oregon Viking

Gold Member
Jan 6, 2014
10,672
28,715
Brookings-Harbor Oregon
Detector(s) used
White's prizm IV
Keene A52 with Gold Hog mats
Gold-N-Sand hand dredge
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Apparently not my step dad is very defensive about it my mother has tried to get him to sell it and nope that doesn't happen lol
Well that's OK. A friend of mine asked, he would bring a trailer and buy it, but he has another car in Medford to pursue.
If you ever see one of these...below pic... let me know! Parts for third gen Firebirds are getting scarce.

firebird 002.JPG



firebird back.jpg
 

JVA5th

Silver Member
Mar 1, 2014
3,538
16,605
Atwater, CA
Detector(s) used
Dues XP, AT Pro, Whites TRX pinpointer, Sampson Ground Shark shovel
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting

crashbandicoot

Gold Member
Sep 27, 2020
12,127
27,040
Dumas,AR
Primary Interest:
All Treasure Hunting
Well that's OK. A friend of mine asked, he would bring a trailer and buy it, but he has another car in Medford to pursue.
If you ever see one of these...below pic... let me know! Parts for third gen Firebirds are getting scarce.

View attachment 2037532


View attachment 2037533
Had a cousin lived,died,and is buried in Medford.Wasn,t born there,ended up there after a long fight with alcoholism,he beat it,and somehow settled in Medford.Don,t mean nothing,just thought I,d mention it.
 

Gene Mean

Bronze Member
Dec 22, 2016
1,673
3,608
Central NJ
Detector(s) used
Garrett ACE 350
Equinox 800
Primary Interest:
Relic Hunting
So, this is a question from a neighbor in a nearby town asking how to stop the tree frog noise. This is what is happening here in central NJ now. Yesterday someone asked why the leaves are falling. It's really sad when city people move to the "country". They also complain about the local food incessantly. They need to go the f back to filthy nyc.
Screenshot 2022-07-19 7.02.41 PM.png
 
Last edited:

Top Member Reactions

Users who are viewing this thread

We Dig Metal Detectors

Latest Discussions

Top